The Effect of Social Media and Eating Disorders

By: Sarah Cohen

Eating disorders are extremely serious and often deadly illnesses that include severe disturbances in eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. There have been numerous studies in which mass media consumption of the “thin ideal body” has been linked to eating disorders among women. Pressure from media has led to women and men internalizing the “thin ideal body” and led to extreme body dissatisfaction which can then lead to eating disorders. While the effect is smaller among men, they are still being subjected to pressure.

Studies have shown “significant change in the weight and size of female and male models portrayed throughout the media in western society and the concept of the ‘perfect or ideal body’.” This explains “why many adolescents are preoccupied with their bodies and dissatisfied with their body image and are willing to try a variety of dangerous weight-loss practices in their quest for the perfect body.”

Most people are usually not aware the amount of manipulation and digital editing done in the fashion industry to create ‘ideal’ female and male bodies. These false images encourage unrealistic and unhealthy standards that are impossible to attain. One study focused on body concerns in girls 16 years old and tried to understand the underlying motivations to be skinny. The element that exerted the largest pressure to be smaller was the media. Another study measured indicators of eating disorders in a population of young Fijian girls after the addition of Western television to their routine. The indicators of eating disorders were exceptionally more prevalent after extended television viewing, demonstrating a negative impact of media. A large component of the data recorded was the theme of subjects describing a new interest in weight loss as a method of modelling themselves after the television characters they viewed.

In order to prevent the effect of social media on disordered eating, here are three tips: choose what media you view and participate in carefully, limit the amount of exposure you have, and test each media’s message for body positivity by asking critical questions about what information they are attempting to spread.

If you or someone you know needs support with their marriage, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/eating-disorders/index.shtml

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792687/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792687/

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/media-eating-disorders

Tiggemann M, Gardiner M, Slater A. “I would rather be size 10 than have straight A’s”: A focus group study of adolescent girls’ wish to be thinner. J Adolesc. 2000;23:645–59.

Becker AE, Burwell RA, Gilman SE, Herzog DB, Hamburg P. Eating behaviours and attitudes following exposure to television among ethnic Fijian adolescent girls. Br J Psychiatry. 2002;180:509–14.

Bulimia Nervosa

Bulimia Nervosa

By: Lauren Hernandez

Bulimia Nervosa is an eating disorder known for episodes of out of control eating and subsequent self-induced methods of purging in order to prevent weight gain. Binging is considered an irresistible compulsion and on average happens about once a week, but can also occur several times a week. Bulimia is most common in women and typically begins in their teens to early 20s. The cultural obsession with a perfect body image, fueled by social media models with unattainable body “goals”, is harmful to young people’s self-esteem and body image. Social media perpetuates a cultural and social expectation of women needing to be thin in order to be beautiful, and this negatively impacts our younger generations.

Signs of Bulimia include:

  • Yellow teeth, erosion of dental enamel
  • Gastrointestinal problems
  • Unexpected weight gain
  • Hair loss
  • Lack of bowel movements
  • Lack of energy
  • Dehydration
  • Red, blistered, or scabbed knuckles

Some typical purging methods include:

  • Vomiting
  • Taking laxatives or diuretics
  • Excessive exercise

Some typical restrictive eating symptoms include:

  • Fasting
  • Disordered Eating

Research has shown that people with Bulimia Nervosa have comorbid mental illnesses such as anxiety, depression, or substance use disorder. Bulimia is also related to personality disorders which effect one’s social, personal, behavioral, and emotional interactions. Bulimia is best treated through a primary care physician, a nutritionist, and a mental health clinician. Cognitive behavioral therapy as well as antidepressants are extremely helpful for those recovering from Bulimia. It is important that schools address eating disorders at an early age in order to educate and bring awareness to young people.

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with an eating disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

 

 

 

 

 

 

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/inside-out-outside-in/201703/what-is-bulimia-nervosa

Image source: https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&id=3DDA12C2C015D07EED4E8521F677C3692EB5A34B&thid=OIP.5ljFRAgr8tpAQ_TSuNjlVgHaE7&mediaurl=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.seasonsmedical.com%2Fwp-content%2Fuploads%2FBulimia-Nervosa-100.jpg&exph=524&expw=788&q=bulimia+nervosa&selectedindex=53&ajaxhist=0&vt=0&eim=1,2,6

Binge Eating Disorder: Know the Signs

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Binge Eating Disorder: Know the Signs

By Jessica Burgess

It is Tuesday night and Jocelyn has sat down after a long day of work and has just finished dinner. She feels a sudden urge to eat two pork chops, a mound of potatoes, and half a pan of the cornbread she had planned to stretch out for the next week with her family. When she is done, she goes to the store and replaces the pan of cornbread before her husband comes home and sees. She feels uncomfortably full, ashamed, and depressed. Why can’t she control her eating?

Jocelyn and many people like her, suffer from Binge Eating Disorder (BED), an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of overeating, usually quickly until the person is overly full. It is not related to hunger and, in fact, some sufferers are not hungry when the binge begins. People with BED, unlike those with bulimia, tend to not compensate for overeating by purging and BED occurs separately from bulimia or anorexia. Episodes of Binge Eating Disorder are characterized by:

  • Eating, in a certain period of time, more food than most people would eat during that time period
  • And a sense of lack of control during the episode

Episodes also tend to include:

  • Eating faster than normal
  • Eating alone due to embarrassment
  • Feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or guilty after an episode

 

If you or someone you know is suffering from binge eating disorder, speak with one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists. Contact us at our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 respectively to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/learn/by-eating-disorder/bed

Image: https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&id=F2C76AFE8AC6C4FF8D667FDD533D889D451488BE&thid=OIP.dKasBi7oeYi1Epsf0KKDcgHaLG&mediaurl=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.psychcentral.com%2Fnlp%2Ffiles%2F2016%2F11%2Fsecreteating.jpg&exph=499&expw=333&q=Secret+Eating&selectedindex=0&ajaxhist=0&vt=0&eim=1,2,6

Binge Eating Disorder: When your Appetite Cannot be Satisfied

By: Sanjita Ekhelikar

“Binging” is a word that is commonly thrown around and used in our everyday language. It is used in contexts ranging from talking about “binging” on a television show on Netflix, to “binging” on food at Thanksgiving dinner. However, this word and toxic is associated with a severe eating disorder known as Binge Eating Disorder, or BED.

In eating disorders such as anorexia, people have excessive amounts of control over what they eat, and as a result restrict calories and lose extreme amounts of weight. BED, on the other hand, is characterized by an absence of control over the consumption of food. Individuals with this disorder feel like they cannot stop eating, and can consume as many as 20,000 calories in one “binge” session.

Although BED impacts about under 10 percent of individuals in terms of eating disorders (Psychology Today), it is an extremely serious problem that should be given proper attention. People often develop this eating disorder as a result of struggling with emotions or another aspect of life, from feeling pressure from society to have a certain body type, or from hormonal causes. Effected individuals can never feel satiated with eating, and often feel shame, guilt, and low self-esteem as a result of their behaviors. BED is frequently comorbid with other mental illnesses including depression and anxiety, and can cause physical complications such as gastrointestinal problems, cardiovascular problems, and type 2 diabetes. BED can be devastating to live with, but with proper treatment, therapy, and medication, it can be stopped and treated.

So next time before you say “binging” in a context unrelated to this illness, think about the implications of the word, and the severity of BED. While you may have the ability to stop “binging” on a TV show or holiday meal, this presents a large challenge for those afflicted with this disease.

If you or someone you know is suffering from binge eating disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

BED: Symptoms, Statistics, and Risks

By: Cassie Sieradzky

Binge eating disorder is characterized by episodes of ingesting large quantities of food to the point of feeling sick, feeling a loss of control during the episodes, guilt and or shame following the binge, and a lack of compensatory behaviors, like purging. Binge eating disorder is the most common eating disorder in America. The recurrent episodes of binging are done within a discrete period of time and can be associated with eating faster than usual, eating until uncomfortably full, eating when not hungry, eating in private due to shame, and feeling guilty and depressed following the binge. To merit a diagnosis, binging episodes must occur at least one a week for 3 months.

Binge eating disorder is 3x more common than anorexia and bulimia combined, with a lifetime prevalence of 3.5% for women and 2% for men. BED is most prevalent in the late teens or early 20s; however it is also reported in young children and adults. About 40% of individuals diagnosed with BED are male and 3 out of 10 individuals seeking weight loss treatments show signs of this disorder.

Psychotherapy is an important part of the treatment. Psychotherapy helps the individual address and work through the emotional problems associated with BED. Individuals with this disorder are at an increased risk of developing another psychiatric disorder such as substance abuse, bulimia, or anorexia. People with BED are also at risk of engaging in self-injurious behavior, suicidal thoughts, and suicidal actions. Along with the emotional problems associated with BED, individuals with this disorder are at an increased risk for developing diabetes, abnormal cholesterol, and high blood pressure.

If you or a loved one appears to be suffering from binge-eating disorder, licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Dryden-Edwards, M. R. (n.d.). Binge Eating Disorder Treatment, Symptoms & Causes. Retrieved January
23, 2018, from https://www.medicinenet.com/binge_eating_disorder/article.htm
Overview and Statistics. (n.d.). Retrieved January 23, 2018, from
https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/binge-eating-disorder