Addiction: Addictive Behaviors

Addiction: Addictive Behaviors

By Marilyn Wells

 

Addictions come in many forms, some of which may be hard to even recognize as a problem. Addictions have serious effects on mental health, physical well-being, and affect the lives of those around the addict.  First, it is important to recognize whether or not you or a loved one is engaging in any addictive behaviors.

Some addictive behaviors include:

  • Inability to quit a certain habit, even when you want to
  • Remaining in the environment the addiction or craving formed in
  • Unable to control the craving
  • Substituting one addictive behavior for another
  • Desire for the craving, even when the craving ceases to result in pleasure
  • Self-medication

Addictive behaviors are often linked to Antisocial Personality Disorder, low tolerance for stress, compulsive behaviors, insecurity and depression.

Addictive behaviors are hard to conquer alone and may be signify another underlying mental health issue. If you or anyone you know is or may be expressing addictive behaviors, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can help you. Please contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively at (201)-368-3700 or (212)-722-1920 to set up an appointment, or visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Resources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/science-choice/201702/10-patterns-addictive-behavior

https://www.elementsbehavioralhealth.com/mental-health/addictive-personality/

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Relationship & Dating Tips

First dates can be exciting, enjoyable, and can open up a wide range of possibilities. If you’re about to spend time with someone new, make sure you keep your eyes open for some red flags that may predict the fate of your relationship down the road.

  • If they pay more attention to electronics than to you during the first date, you can easily tell where their priorities are.
  • If they spend the majority of the time talking about themselves during the date, it is possible you might end up with a narcissist.
  • Disclosing how much they hate their job or friend or relative, especially on a first date, should make you apprehensive. This shows that they have a history of tumultuous relationships.
  • Talking about an ex or comparing you to an ex is a huge indicator that your date is still hanging on to the past.
  • Asking if someone is enjoying the restaurant/music/movie is fine. You might find yourself becoming uncomfortable with how many times you need to reassure them. However, asking many times throughout the night how things are going may be a sign of low self-esteem.
  • If during the date they disclose a view that is fundamentally different from yours, don’t ignore it! Having different opinions is fine, but if your core beliefs are too different, this could make for some serious clashing in a relationship.
  • Being unnecessarily rude towards the waiter, a parking attendant, or other person in front of you is never a good sign. If they blow up on people for small things, imagine how they’d treat you if they thought you did something wrong!

If you learn to recognize the red flags, you will be able to know when to call a first date your last date!

If you’re dealing with relationship problems, consider reaching out to the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, social workers, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722 1920 to set up an appointment.

Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Source: Degges-White, Suzanne. “13 First Date Red Flags.” Psychology Today. Sussex Publishers, 31 Mar. 2016. Web. 01 Apr. 2016.

By: Scout H

How to Recognize a Sociopath

Sociopaths: devious, controlling, cunning. If you ever come across someone with this toxic antisocial personality disorder, it is important to know how to recognize the signs for your own personal safety. These people repeatedly disregard the feelings of others while seeking only to please themselves. They are unable to have the ability to organize their emotions and therefore have no shame about their actions, regardless of how it makes those around them feel. Often, they find internal gratification from hurting others. Below are some warning signs to help you identify a sociopath:

  • A discrepancy between what the person says, and what the person does
  • Making excuses for themselves when they are caught in a lie
  • Changing the subject when they are caught in a lie
  • Beating around the bush when asked questions about the lie you caught them in or not answering them directly
  • Knowing others’ vulnerabilities and manipulating them for personal gain
  • Ability to understand laws and rules, but being unable to understand emotionally why those rules are in place
  • No feelings of shame when they know they have hurt other people
  • Repeatedly putting themselves in situations which could get them arrested
  • Disregarding the safety of themselves or others
  • Constant irritability, hostility, and antagonism
  • Performing cruel and gruesome acts on animals

If these warning signs sound like they apply to yourself or someone you know, it is very important to start therapy. With the help of a medical professional, the combination of medication and psychotherapy can help people with this personality disorder.

The psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, social workers, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can help you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722 1920 to set up an appointment.

Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Sources:

“Sociopath X – ALL ABOUT SOCIOPATHS – Sociopathic Personality Disorder and Types.” D for Depression Depressive Psychological Disorders. Depression D, 2010. Web. 04 Mar. 2016.

By: Scout H

Drug Addiction and Alcohol Abuse: False Promises – Bergen County, NJ

By: Davine Holness

alcoholism addiction

Alcoholism is one of many addictions from which people suffer

With the ever-increasing number of resources available, there have been numerous success stories for recovering from addictions such as alcoholism. However, even after decades of sobriety, every day can still be a fight against temptation. This temptation is not so much about the substance or activity to which one is addicted; it’s more about the lies the object tells: the promises to fill a hole in the addict’s soul. Resisting addiction is about learning to identify these promises as what they are: false.

 

While the media has given much publicity to alcoholism and substance abuse, people also suffer from addiction to anything from gambling or shopping, to food, sex, or even video games. Recent research has found that sweet, salty, or fatty processed foods cause the same physiological process in the mind of a food addict as crack produces in a cocaine addict (Peeke). However, with help and lifestyle changes, it is possible to overcome addiction and live a sober life.

 

If you are struggling with any kind of addiction, the psychologists, psychiatrists, and therapists at Arista Counseling and Psychiatric Services can help. Contact the Bergen County, New Jersey or Manhattan offices at 201-368-3700 or 212-722-1920. Visit www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

 

Sources:

Nakken, C. (1996). The addictive personality: understanding the addictive process and compulsive behavior (2nd ed.). Center City, Minn.: Hazelden.

On Rejecting the False Promise, 25 Years Later – World of Psychology. (n.d). PsychCentral.com. Retrieved May 14, 2012

Peeke, P. & Aalst, M. v. (2012). The hunger fix: the three-stage solution to free yourself from your food addictions for life. Emmaus, Pa.: Rodale Books.

Hypnosis and How it Helps: The Clinical Uses of a Trance

By: Davine Holness

Improve your life with hypnosis

Hypnosis can help you quit smoking and has many other clinical uses

Have you ever taken the first several steps of a habitual journey before you realized where you were going?  Ever checked out mentally while driving, jogging, or riding the bus?  Ever gotten so wrapped up in a book that you were no longer aware of your surroundings?  If you’ve had any of these experiences, you’ve been in a trance before.  Hypnosis puts subjects in a similar kind of trance – they reach a state of inner absorption, concentration, and focused attention.

People are often mystified by the idea of hypnosis.  Yet, it is safe and has been proven effective for a wide variety of uses in clinical settings.

Hypnosis is used for:

  • Therapy with victims of violent and/or sexual crimes
  • Smoking cessation
  • Weight control
  • Sexual dysfunctions
  • Concentration, test anxiety, and learning disorders
  • Anxiety and stress management
  • Bed-wetting
  • Depression
  • And a variety of medical problems such as burns, nausea, allergies, and pain relief.

Hypnosis works because our mind can be used more powerfully when it is intensely focused.  Hypnosis takes away the constraints and inhibitions set forth by the conscious mind, letting the unconscious take over.  Contrary to common misconceptions, hypnosis does not cause you to surrender your will.  In fact, it won’t work unless you are a willing participant and allow your mind to be open to suggestion.  Another prevalent myth is that hypnosis causes you to completely lose consciousness and subsequently forget what happened during the session.  Actually, most patients late recall everything that happened while they were under hypnosis.

When choosing a hypnosis provider, it is important to carefully select a qualified individual.  Look for a professional who is licensed, not just certified, in their field by the state.  Lay hypnotists may be certified but lack the medical and psychological training to be licensed.  If you are facing a problem that you think may be improved through hypnosis, the licensed professionals at Arista Counseling and Psychotherapy can assist you.  Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Source:

Grohol, J. M. (2013, October 9). Clinical Hypnosis. Clinical Hypnosis. Retrieved May 15, 2014