Addiction: Ways to Overcome it

 

Addiction: Ways to Overcome it

By: Daniela Vargas

Falling into addiction can feel like you have lost control of your life. But, you can gain that control back. Addiction can involve different substances like alcohol, gambling, drugs like cocaine and heroin. Now, you may ask how addiction starts or why people continue using these substances? The reason for this is that when you take a substance or do a certain behavior it makes you feel good and stress free. That “good feeling” is a neurotransmitter called dopamine. Dopamine is a chemical that your brain releases when you feel pleasure or satisfaction.

Psychotherapy:

Psychotherapy can help one overcome addiction. Psychotherapy has many ways which therapists can use depending on the situation. Here are some that can help with addiction.

  • Supportive Psychotherapy: Can help patients feel safe and comfortable sharing their experiences and troubles. A therapist can be a strong guide throughout your journey and give advice to help you push through.
  • Coping- focused psychotherapy: This method can teach patients ways to cope with substance abuse. This method, combines individual therapy with a Relapse Prevention programs.
  • Exploratory Psychotherapy: It is important to find the root of the problem. This type of psychotherapy can help uncover connections with your addiction.

Medication:

Medication or a combination of both medication and Psychotherapy can help overcome addiction.

  • Naltrexone: can help reduce craving of alcohol
  • Buprenorphine: this medication can help reduce Opioid withdrawal symptoms. Buprenorphine helps to block and activate the opioid receptors in the brain.
  • Methadone: Can also reduce Opioid withdrawal symptoms
  • Bupropion: can reduce withdrawal symptoms for nicotine addiction. This medication is also prescribed for people battling with depression.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/addiction

https://www.mentalhelp.net/substance-abuse/psychotherapy/

https://www.drugabuse.gov/publications/principles-adolescent-substance-use-disorder-treatment-research-based-guide/evidence-based-approaches-to-treating-adolescent-substance-use-disorders/addiction-medications

Image: https://www.google.com/search?q=addiction&rlz=1C5CHFA_enUS752US752&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwi88tufv6juAhXjct8KHR3ZAF0Q_AUoAnoECBAQBA&biw=1434&bih=687#imgrc=qyOm9dPoiVdWaM

 

Addiction: Supporting My Adult Child Through Addiction

Addiction: Supporting My Adult Child Through Addiction
By Emma Yasukawa

Being a parent means that your children always come first and from a young age, you teach them to make good decisions because children form plenty of life decisions on their own. For example, there are plenty of adult children who make the decision on whether or not they will try drugs or alcohol; even after hearing all of the possible side-effects and risks of addiction. This decision ultimately has an effect on parents and may leave them second-guessing their parenting skills and whether or not they did something wrong as parents.

If you are a parent of an adult child who is not making good decisions and their future seems uncertain, this can be a heavy burden on you. You must take a deep breath and remind yourself that your child is no longer your responsibility legally, and that they inevitably chose this path. Though, there are a few ways that a parent can help their adult child dealing with addiction:

1. Adult children who are addicted to a substance tend to feel as if the whole world is against them and that they feel as if they ‘had no other choice.’ As a parent it is important to remind your child that it was their conscious decision that leads them to where they are. Ultimately, this can remind them that they always have a choice and that it is not too late to seek help.

2. As a parent, you will always want to support your child emotionally and financially if needed. It is a parent’s heart to want to always help, but sometimes you are causing more harm than good. It is important to offer assistance and support but only to the degree that you are able to, and knowing that it is actually bettering your child’s future.

3. Love your child. Love comes in many different forms and sometimes integrating tough love is the best kind of love. This means holding him/her accountable for their behavior, and possibly setting up an intervention if needed.

4. While it is easy for the addicted child to become the center of attention, it is important to not allow this to affect the rest of your family. Of course it will be on everyone’s mind but, it should not get to the point where it will split up a family.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com

Resources: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/lifetime-connections/201410/7-tips-mothers-adult-addicts

Image Source: https://vertavahealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Addictioncampuses.com-Getting-Help-For-An-Adult-Child-Addicted-To-Drugs-And-Alcohol.jpg
 

Shopping Addiction (Yes, it’s Real)

shopaholic

Sonya Cheema

We are becoming more materialistic than ever now that we’re able to see the daily activities of rich people on social media every day – Kim Kardashian using a skincare regimen that costs more than your rent, Jeffree Star custom painting his Rolls Royce pink, various Instagram-famous models advertising their “favorite” detox tea, etc. It’s no wonder why we always feel the need to buy whatever’s new and trending. Getting caught up in the trends may be fun, but it could also lead to an overload of items you don’t need, debt you can’t repay, and guilt. Shopping addiction is real and should be brought to everyone’s attention, especially now.

Shopping addiction, or shopoholism, is just like any other addiction. The more you buy, the better you feel. Individuals suffering from this will get a “high” when they shop, meaning their endorphins and dopamine are activated, which reinforces their shopping problem. Some signs that a person may be addicted to shopping are:

  • Shopping to ease anxiety, depression, or other negative feelings/emotions
  • Engaging arguments with others about spending
  • Feeling lost without credit cards and/or having withdrawal symptoms without them
  • Purchasing items through credit instead of cash
  • Getting a high after spending money
  • Feeling guilty, ashamed, or embarrassed after spending
  • Lying about how much money was spent
  • Thinking obsessively about money
  • Trying to juggle different accounts and bills to accommodate for more spending

If you recognize a shopping addiction within yourself or someone else, it may be best to seek therapy for yourself or the person, have an intervention for the person, or look up the nearest Debtors Anonymous meeting for additional support.

Some suggestions for what to do in the meantime are to get rid of checkbooks and credit cards, shop with someone else, and find other meaningful ways to spend your time. While these suggestions are crucial to recovery, seeking professional help and receiving therapy may be more beneficial.

If you or a person you know is struggling with shopping addiction, it may be beneficial to contact a mental health professional and receive therapy. The psychologists, psychiatrists, and therapists at Arista Counseling and Psychiatric Services can help. Contact the Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920. Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

 

Source used:

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/addiction/features/shopping-spree-addiction#4