Anxiety: An Everyday Occurrence

 

 

Anxiety: An Everyday Occurrence

By: Daniela Vargas

“One-third of adults in the U.S. will grapple with out-of-control anxiety at some point during their lifetime” It is common for people to get anxiety before an upcoming event like the first day of classes or before giving a presentation, however when you are anxious constantly and have excessive stress you might have an anxiety disorder.

Living in constant fear can stop you from living your everyday life. Your work, school and personal life can all be affected. It can affect you when you’re going to a party where there will be a lot of people, or getting into an elevator. In extreme cases being scared when leaving your house. Reasons that could have led to anxiety can be early trauma, parents being overprotective or even social media. Both therapy and medication can help relieve your everyday anxiety.

Types of Therapy:

Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT): This form of therapy is very commonly used treat anxiety. It examines your negative thoughts and how you react to certain situations that can give you anxiety.

Exposure Therapy: This type of therapy exposes you to the situations that make you anxious and by repeating them your anxiety starts to diminish and you start to feel control over your body and thoughts. This can be done in real life or through imagination.

Exercising and relaxation techniques can help reduce anxiety as well.

Medication:

Benzodiazepines: These types of medication can help relax your muscles and mind. Some sedatives are Xanax, Valium and Librium.

Buspirone: This medication can help to regulate chemicals in your brain. This medication is for both short and long-term anxiety.

If you or someone you know is struggling with anxiety, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:

https://www.helpguide.org/articles/anxiety/therapy-for-anxiety-disorders.htm

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/anxiety

https://www.healthline.com/health/anxiety-drugs#betablockers

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Autism: How it affects the Parents

Autism: How it affects the Parents

By: Daniela Vargas

Finding out about your child having Autism can be very difficult for parents. It can affect them mentally, emotionally, financially and their marital relationships.

Parents can get very stressed out when they find out their child has Autism. This stress can lead parents to have anxiety and depression because they sometimes feel like things seem out of control and they can get very frustrated. This can also happen if parents are not giving their 50%. If one parent is paying more attention to their child it can cause a lot of stress and also partner relationship issues.

Usually it is the mothers who are more engaged with their child and because they invest all of their time into helping their Autistic child they lack on their social and relationship life. They want their best for their child and sometimes this can mean only one parent works while the other stays at home taking care of the child. Not only is this more stress on the stay at home parent but it can affect couples financially.

Having only one income source and having to pay for therapy and classes can start to mount up. Out of pocket expenses every week can become an economic burden. A study showed that “mothers with children with ASD earn an average of 56% less than the mothers of children with no health limitation” That’s a reduction in earnings of over 50%.

To reduce parent stress, anxiety and depression there are different types of support groups and interventions.

If you or someone you know is struggling with parental stress due to Autism please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:

https://www.longdom.org/open-access/impact-of-autism-spectrum-disorder-on-family-44919.html#:~:text=Having%20a%20child%20with%20Autism,the%20family%2C%20poor%20sibling%20relationships%2C

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/autism

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What is Cognitive Therapy

 

 

What is Cognitive Therapy? (CBT)

By: Daniela Vargas

Cognitive Behavioral therapy also known as CBT, is based on our feelings, thoughts, behaviors and physiology. Sometimes our emotions get in the way of our thoughts. Situations can trigger negative thoughts, which lead to negative emotions and making us react in a certain way.

Your cognitive therapist will ask you what your goals are and focus what are the barriers blocking those goals. Your negative thoughts might make you stop and not continue to achieve those goals; cognitive therapy will turn those thoughts into positive and realistic ones.

Everyone’s process is different, some might see results within months, and others may see them in a few years. Some might find this type of therapy difficult because of how long it takes to see results, but that is because it takes time and skills to change the patterns of negative thoughts. The goal is to make these skills second nature.

If you or someone you know is in the need of cognitive therapy please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201)-368-3700 or (212) – 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

 

Sources:

https://cogbtherapy.com/what-is-cognitive-therapy

https://www.wisegeek.com/what-is-cognitive-therapy.htm

Image:

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Autism: How it affects the Siblings

Autism: How it affects the siblings

By: Daniela Vargas

People with Autism struggle with social and communication skills. It is a disorder that affects how they process information. By the age of 2 doctors can determine if your child has Autism. Autism is usually four times more common in men than in women. People with Autism go to therapy and practice to reduce some of their symptoms. Autism is difficult for the people who have it, as well as for their siblings

The siblings tend to have issues with their social and emotional skills. It is common to find that the siblings share some traits as their autistic sibling. This can happen through genetics. The siblings do not have it as strong as their autistic sibling, but there could be some developmental delays. It can also be hard for siblings to understand and they can get frustrated the way that their Autistic sibling acts. Children with Autism are very kind and caring and independent. When it comes to playtime their siblings might feel upset with the way they interact.

A good way to improve the relationship between siblings is to explain the nature of Autism to them at a young age what Autism is. As they grow older they will understand their sibling might react a bit differently to certain things. Also, don’t forget to pay attention to your children that don’t have Autism. It is common for parents to get very invested in their Autistic child and not give enough attention to their other children.

It is important to pay attention to all of your children and to focus all children’s social and emotion skills because they can have difficulties or have another underlying condition.

If you or someone you know is struggling with Autism please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources

https://www.spectrumnews.org/news/siblings-children-autism-social-emotional-problems/#:~:text=Siblings%20of%20autistic%20children%20are,other%20forms%20of%20developmental%20delay https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/autismhttps://raisingchildren.net.au/autism/communicating-relationships/family-relationships/siblings-asd

Image: https://www.forbes.com/sites/solrogers/2019/04/03/how-virtual-reality-can-help-those-with-autism/

 

Stress and Academic Performance

How to help children and teens manage their stress

Stress: Stress and Academic Performance

By. Alexis Yennie

Stress affects all of us in various ways; whether it be students studying for an exam or adults and being overloaded with work. Stress can also affect various activities that we do on a daily basis. There are many underlying factors of stress with vary from person to person. In today’s society, children are becoming more stressed than ever. This is due to the constant pressure being put on them to receive the highest grade or even get into a good school. The pressure that is being put on them to balance school life and family/friend’s life can become a huge challenge for many.

There are multiple ways that stress can negatively affect a student’s performance. 1.) High levels of stress can decrease sleep quality; research has found that adolescents need at least eight hours of sleep a night to perform at their best. When they do not get the proper amount of sleep due to stress, this can cause them to have a lack of concentration and the inability to remember correctly. 2.) High levels of stress make students angrier; stress can also be the main reason for an increase in bullying due to irritability and the likelihood of angry outbursts. Directing their stress onto others can also increase bullying. And 3.) High levels of stress can worsen grades; when a student becomes stressed this can take over their ability to focus and can even lead to students dropping out of school.

It is very vital for parents, as well as educators and those supporting them, to become aware/educated about the significant impact stress has on adolescents and young adults. AS a whole, we should be creating a supportive and calm environment so that children succeed at their academic best. Some solutions to overcoming stress amongst adolescents are to conduct wellness checks; such as weekly one-on-one therapy sessions or even group therapy with other students. Also, making health programs available to students to them as needed.

If you or someone you know is struggling with high levels of stress and academic performance or family relationships pertaining to high levels of stress, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioner, or psychotherapist at Arista Counseling and Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201)-368-3700 or (212)-722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit https://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources: https://partners.pennfoster.edu/blog/2016/september/3-ways-stress-negatively-affects-student-performance#:~:text=When%20a%20student%20is%20stressed,of%20school%20or%20drop%20classes.&text=As%20research%20shows%2C%20stress%20exhibited,students%20while%20in%20the%20classroom.

Image Source: https://www.apa.org/topics/child-development/stress

 

Eating Disorders and Family Relationships

The emotional impact of eating disorders on families

Eating Disorders: Eating Disorders and Family Relationships

By. Alexis Yennie

Different eating disorders, whether it be anorexia nervosa or bulimia, all eat away at different relationships that we have in our lives, such as family, friends and loved ones. The main reason that we are alive on this planet is because of the relationships/human connections that we have with others. When eating disorders appear, they can diminish and break down these relationships causing negative thoughts and behaviors to surround everything around you. The more progression that eating disorders make on an individual, the more negative effects take place on not only them, but those around them as well.

Eating disorders are known to create feelings of isolation, hopelessness and separation. It is very common for loved ones to feel as though they have lost someone, when they watch someone they care about battle with an eating disorder. Though at one point there might have been a very strong bond between people, eating disorders tend to destroy any chance of hope/love a person might have for others; as these hopelessness/loveless emotions rise, the people that once cared for the person battling the eating disorder, eventually break off, due to feelings of hopelessness, or even the feeling of being replaced by the vicious monster inside of them

Family members of individuals that are suffering with eating disorders, know that your presence is wanted, even though it might not always seem like it and it does make a difference to them. Loving someone at this point in their life, might just be the encouragement that they need to fight for their life. Recovery is possible and never lose hope. Relationships can be fixed, and recovery is beautiful.

If you or someone you know is struggling with an eating disorder or family relationships pertaining to their eating disorders, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioner, or psychotherapist at Arista Counseling and Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ  or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201)-368-3700 or (212)-722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit https://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Image Source: https://www.sovteens.com/health-and-wellness/emotional-impact-eating-disorders-families/

Sources: https://www.eatingdisorderhope.com/treatment-for-eating-disorders/family-role/how-eating-disorders-can-affect-relationships

 

What Do Dreams Tell Us About Our Mental Health?

   By: Kassandra Lora

Have you ever wondered if dreams are a reflection of our subconscious trying to send a message or if they are just meaningless? What do these specific dreams tell us about our mental health?

    One type of dreaming, besides the occasional nightmares, is lucid dreaming. Lucid dreaming is when the dreamer is aware they are dreaming but, without waking up, they can control what they do in the dream as well as the outcome of the dream. Some people lucid dream regularly while others rarely and some cannot lucid dream at all. So, what does lucid dreaming show us about our mental health? In an article written in the PsychologyToday magazine, they discussed an observation conducted with a group of undergraduate students who participated in a sleep study. The results stated how, “Intense lucid dreamers had, on average, lower levels of psychological distress.” It was explained that individuals who have more intense lucid dreams had less depression, stress, and anxiety than individuals who had less intense lucid dreams.  However, those who don’t lucid dream at all had no difference in psychological wellbeing when compared to those who have very intense lucid dreams.  It is interesting to see how something like lucid dreaming can have such a perspective on psychological health.

    Besides measuring psychological distress, according to the Psych Central website, dreams have many mental health benefits as well. Some benefits of dreams include:

  • Helping you learn: Dreams allow your brain to make sense of new information that has been learned.
  • Being therapeutic to a person: dreams can help a person heal real-life emotions through dreams.
  • Helping you overcome your fear: lucid dreaming can allow you to practice facing and overcoming what you are afraid to do in real life.

If you or someone you know needs help regarding sleep and dreams, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/social-instincts/201804/what-dreams-may-tell-you-about-your-mental-health

https://psychcentral.com/blog/brain-and-mental-health-benefits-of-dreaming#2

Image source: https://wallhere.com/en/wallpaper/781179

Loneliness During Covid-19

By Eleanor Kim

As we round out one year of stay at home orders and self-quarantine measures due to the novel coronavirus, many are reflecting on their time at home and their mental health during this period. While every individual’s experience over this past year has been unique, one experience seems to be universal-loneliness. Folks around the world were left to deal with their own fears and anxieties regarding the virus and general health and safety of loved ones without the usual group of support from family and friends. This experience was exacerbated for those that were left to face the effects of COVID-19 on their own as unforeseen circumstances forced individuals into isolation.

A recent study found that 65% of participants felt increased feelings of loneliness since the official declaration of the pandemic. In that same study, 76% reported feelings of anxiety, 58% reported a loss of feelings of connectedness, and 78% reported feelings of depression. These feelings of loneliness have far reaching effects as another study found a link between loneliness and heart problems, diabetes, stroke, memory complaints, drug abuse risk, and elevated blood pressure. Other issues include trouble sleeping, negative relationships with food, and an increased reliance on maladaptive coping skills such as drinking and gambling. Loneliness is not a new condition; however, the magnitude in which it is presenting itself is alarming and deserving of a closer watch, especially among younger and older generations.

Now more than ever, it is crucial that individuals strengthen the relationship that they have with themselves. Each emotion that has presented itself during this past year is valid and expected during such a trying and unknown time. It is recommended that individuals welcome these feelings and try their best not to avoid or deny such states of mind. The effects of coronavirus and the impact it has had on the physical and mental wellbeing of people around the world unfortunately will continue to be felt as we trek towards the “new normal” and sense of global stability. It is essential that individuals remind themselves that they are not alone during these times of loneliness and that there are resources available to help cope with any feelings of unrest or isolation.

Online services such as Zoom or Cisco Webex offer opportunities for groups to interact in a virtual setting that will help simulate a sense of community and togetherness. Socially-distanced gatherings may be an option for those who are able to meet in an outdoor or well ventilated area, weather permitting. Experts recommend limiting time spent on social media as excessive time spent on these apps and websites could instill feelings of frustration, anxiety, and comparison with others. Should these feelings of loneliness and isolation persist, telehealth is available for those who may wish to speak to mental health professionals throughout these difficult times.

If you or someone you know is feeling lonely or isolated, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

References:

https://www.sharp.com/health-news/managing-loneliness-during-covid-19.cfm

https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/alarming-covid-19-study-shows-80-of-respondents-report-significant-symptoms-of-depression#Making-things-better

Image Source:

https://lifesupportscounselling.com.au/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/loneliness-in-lockdown.jpg

Impostor Syndrome

By Veronica Oquendo

Imagine a scenario, you have gained a promotion at your job, and you are now Vice President of your company. Furthermore, your bosses want to congratulate you with an office party, and plaque for your outstanding achievement that earned your promotion. When you are at your office party you have an overwhelming feeling that you do not deserve this promotion and recognition. You think that you are not intelligent enough to hold this new position. You put a lot of effort into your work, but not anymore than anyone else would, even though others recognize your high work ethic. Worst of all, you feel that the other employees will find out you are do not deserve it, be scrutinized for it, and eventually fail. This scenario is not an uncommon occurrence, where 25-30% of high achievers currently suffer the feelings of imposter syndrome, and 70% of adults have experienced it at one point in their lifetime. The highest populations that feel imposter syndrome are women of color. 

Reasons for imposter syndrome: 

  • High pressure to succeed
  • Perfectionism 
  • Mental Health Issues 

It is important to note that imposter syndrome is not an official diagnosis in the DSM, but is a feeling an often associated with success, even more so among those suffering from anxiety and depression.

If you or someone you know is struggling with imposter syndrome, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources: 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/imposter-syndrome

https://www.apa.org/gradpsych/2013/11/fraud

Zoom Fatigue

By Veronica Oquendo

Covid-19 has made it risky to meet in-person for education, for fear of spread of the infection. Thankfully, there was a solution to this, the virtual classroom. Educators have been using different virtual platforms (Google meets, Blue Jeans, Skype) to meet with students, but none as popular as Zoom. Unfortunately, along with the virtual classroom come its negative consequences. Zoom fatigue is a new psychological phenomenon that is the tiredness, burnout, and worry from too much time on virtual platforms. This defined the exhaustion millions of students have been experiencing spending many hours a day sitting behind a screen, in front of a camera, attempting to learn. This leaves many wondering, how can this be? There are many reasons causing zoom fatigue including:

Audio Delays

The audio delays that come from the internet connection are interpreted as a negative reaction, therefore causing distrust between the individuals in the zoom conference. 

Deviation of Social Norms 

Virtual meetings have made abiding by our social norms difficult, and many times we send negative messages to each other, which in turn deplete our cognitive energy. Two examples are interruption and lack of privacy of personal space. Interruption is when one person speaks when another person is not done speaking, thereby stopping the other person from finishing their complete thought. The lack of privacy of personal space is from having a streamed video of someone’s personal space, which includes seeing their private home and sometimes seeing and hearing the other people they live with.

Lack of Direct Eye Contact

There is much evidence saying that a mutual connection with others is helped by direct eye contact. This is also another example of deviation from a social norm, which stated previously depletes cognitive energy. Lastly, there is a cost-reward system in the brain that is engaged when there is eye contact. 

Inactivity 

Zoom requires you to sit for long extended periods of time. Physical activity is linked to less fatigue. 

If you or someone you know is struggling with zoom fatigue, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources: 

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/positively-media/202011/suffering-zoom-fatigue-here-s-why-0

https://www.psychiatrictimes.com/view/psychological-exploration-zoom-fatigue