Anxiety: Social Anxiety during COVID-19

Anxiety: Social Anxiety during COVID-19

By: Rebecca Collette

As a society, we are accustomed to our regular routines, including spending time in close quarters with others and visiting public places. As we are occupying more time indoors due to COVID-19, there has been an increase in stress and anxiety when we see ourselves having to interact with others in public. This type of anxiety is also referred to as social anxiety; where an individual fears the chance of being judged or rejected by others in social or public settings. Since COVID-19 has introduced some questionable boundaries for social relationships, more individuals are experiencing instances of social anxiety than average. Here are some tips to help manage your anxiety if you’re planning on venturing out!

Set Realistic Expectations – You can’t please everyone! When going out in public, prepare yourself to come into contact with a few uncomfortable situations. If you understand that if you upset someone and can forgive yourself for it, it will only help to decrease your anxiety.

Avoid the Need for Reassurance – Reassurance means you are checking that you are doing everything “right.” With the unpredictability and questionability of the situation that COVID-19 has brought upon us, we cannot expect to be doing everything “right.” You must allow yourself to make mistakes and realize that you cannot please everyone.

Seek Help When Needed – Uncomfortable situations are going to come up. It’s normal to feel uncomfortable when faced with a new problem or situation and it’s not a sign you did something wrong. However, if the anxiety doesn’t go away, you may suffer from social anxiety and should seek professional help.

If you or someone you know needs support with anxiety, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Source: https://adaa.org/learn-from-us/from-the-experts/blog-posts/consumer/social-anxiety-during-covid-19

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Depression: Social Depression

By: Nicolette Ferrante

Social Anxiety and Depression are two of the most commonly diagnosed mental disorders in the United States.  Social Anxiety Disorder is the fear of being rejected or embarrassing oneself in a social setting. Depression is a mood disorder that causes a persistent, deep feeling of sadness and loss of interest in things someone once enjoyed.  Although these are two separate diagnoses, they can co-occur.

            Social symptoms of depression include avoiding any type of contact with friends/family, not wanting to attend activities involving social interaction and neglecting normal behavior and interests that were once enjoyed. People with social anxiety disorder are six times more likely to develop a mood disorder such as depression. Social Phobias prevent people from making friends, applying for jobs, pursuing relationships and being a part of any social setting at all.

            Avoidance is the only way to cope with social anxiety. They withdraw out of fear of embarrassing themselves or not fitting in. Those with Social Anxiety disorder want to socialize, but the fear is far too much to bring them to. The uncontrollable anxiety and inability to socialize often leads to the feelings of hopelessness, isolation and frustration. Neglecting themselves from social interactions, sometimes leads to depression, due to the loneliness. Not everyone with SAD will experience depression.

                 If you or someone you know needs support with their mental illness, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources:

Social Anxiety and Depression

Separation Anxiety Disorder (SAD) in Children

By: Tamar Asayan

School Phobia is now referred to Separation Anxiety. It can also be known as school refusal or school avoidance because it makes going to school very difficult for children. Separation Anxiety Disorder is when someone has excessive fear or anxiety about leaving their home or an attachment figure. In children, their attachment figure is usually their parents because they see them as a figure of protection and do not want to leave their side. Humans require an attachment to parental figures because they provide love, protection, and care to us. Children attach their deepest fears to their parents because they believe they can make any fear go away.

Children who have separation anxiety have a difficult time sleeping alone, going to school, avoiding play dates, and do anything to stay at home with their parents. They also experience symptoms of dizziness, upset stomach, nausea, vomiting, headaches, and have difficulty sleeping. These symptoms can lead to children not wanting to leave their house even more because the thought of a parent leaving can give symptoms of panic and anxious thoughts.

Separation Anxiety Disorder is more common in children who suffer from parents separating or going through a divorce. Any detachment from a parent is experienced as a life threatening danger to the child. They fear they no longer will be protected and will be left alone by their parents. These feelings of anxiety are relieved when they are safe in the presence of their parents to reassure them that they are not going anywhere. In order for children to overcome their separation anxiety and their fear to attend school it is important to seek help as early as they can.

The best method in treating Separation Anxiety Disorder is by Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT); it helps parents and children learn new coping skills when they are separated from each other. It is also important to make your child feel safe and protected in the environment they are living in and develop trust in their parents that they are not going to leave them.

If you are a parent and are concerned about your child having separation anxiety call the licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/inside-out-outside-in/201505/what-is-separation-anxiety 

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