Binge Eating Disorder: Know the Signs

secreteating

Binge Eating Disorder: Know the Signs

By Jessica Burgess

It is Tuesday night and Jocelyn has sat down after a long day of work and has just finished dinner. She feels a sudden urge to eat two pork chops, a mound of potatoes, and half a pan of the cornbread she had planned to stretch out for the next week with her family. When she is done, she goes to the store and replaces the pan of cornbread before her husband comes home and sees. She feels uncomfortably full, ashamed, and depressed. Why can’t she control her eating?

Jocelyn and many people like her, suffer from Binge Eating Disorder (BED), an eating disorder characterized by recurrent episodes of overeating, usually quickly until the person is overly full. It is not related to hunger and, in fact, some sufferers are not hungry when the binge begins. People with BED, unlike those with bulimia, tend to not compensate for overeating by purging and BED occurs separately from bulimia or anorexia. Episodes of Binge Eating Disorder are characterized by:

  • Eating, in a certain period of time, more food than most people would eat during that time period
  • And a sense of lack of control during the episode

Episodes also tend to include:

  • Eating faster than normal
  • Eating alone due to embarrassment
  • Feeling disgusted with oneself, depressed, or guilty after an episode

 

If you or someone you know is suffering from binge eating disorder, speak with one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists. Contact us at our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 respectively to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source: https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/learn/by-eating-disorder/bed

Image: https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&id=F2C76AFE8AC6C4FF8D667FDD533D889D451488BE&thid=OIP.dKasBi7oeYi1Epsf0KKDcgHaLG&mediaurl=http%3A%2F%2Fblogs.psychcentral.com%2Fnlp%2Ffiles%2F2016%2F11%2Fsecreteating.jpg&exph=499&expw=333&q=Secret+Eating&selectedindex=0&ajaxhist=0&vt=0&eim=1,2,6

Advertisements

Eating Disorders: Overeating

eating

Eating Disorders: Overeating

By: Daniela Chica

In past decades, eating disorders have been linked to not eating or to binging and then purging, but nowadays even overeating without the purge can be seen as an eating disorder. Not just anyone who eats a whole tub of ice cream can be diagnosed with this disorder. However, someone who is experiencing a constant need to eat in order to deal with their emotions may be diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) or Compulsive Eating Disorder (COD). For this reason, BED and COD, are both disorders that deal with and are affected by one’s emotions.

Much like in drug and alcohol addiction, people with BED and COD experience “feel good” symptoms when engaged in their overeating, symptoms that are responsible for their psychological addiction. This is one reason why it can be difficult to treat because overeating rewires the brain’s neural pathways. Another reason it can be very difficult to treat BED and COD is that identifying the emotions that trigger the overeating is not an easy task. This is because overeating occurs subconsciously or without even thinking about it. Even after identifying what the emotional problem is, it can still be difficult to set up a treatment plan because the goal is to come up with healthier ways of coping with the problem. It is much easier to turn to something accessible like food rather than dealing with the problem in a more complex way.

If you or someone you know is experiencing any type of eating disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-out/201501/the-truth-about-overeating

Holiday Depression

downloadHoliday Depression

by Fabienne Turenne

As we are in the midst of the holiday season, there are many festivities occurring. We see Christmas decorations, tree lightings, holiday sale commercials, and Christmas music playing on the radio in almost every store we enter. These are all meant to promote the common themes of the holidays such as joy, cheer, happiness and giving. While for most people the holiday season is a time of joy and happiness, many suffer from holiday depression, stress, anxiety, and overeating.

About 10% percent of the population suffers from holiday depression due to many different factors.  The holidays tend to remind us of a happier time in our lives such as memories of past holidays with a loved one who is no longer with us. It may also depress us to see others sharing the season with their loved ones while we feel alone and isolated.

Stress is also increased during the holiday season. We often reunite with family members we haven’t seen in a while which can cause old arguments to reignite. As holiday sales start and everyone starts to go shopping for presents, shopping lines increase tremendously and parking spaces become impossible to find. More money is spent during this season which can also be stressful for many. Those who suffer from holiday depression and stress may use overeating as a way of coping due to the abundance of food available at family gatherings.

Holiday depression, anxiety, stress, and overeating may be due to any one of the factors listed above however, it could also be a combination of these things as well as an ongoing depression or anxiety. A mental disorder such as depression or anxiety can be worsened by holiday stresses. If you find yourself becoming depressed during this season or if you are someone who already suffers from a mental disorder that is becoming worse due to the holiday season, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our therapists. Arista Counseling & Psychological Services (212) 722–1920 or (201) 368-3700.

Source:

http://psychcentral.com/lib/helpful-hints-for-navigating-the-holidays/0002632