The Effect of Social Media and Eating Disorders

By: Sarah Cohen

Eating disorders are extremely serious and often deadly illnesses that include severe disturbances in eating behaviors and related thoughts and emotions. There have been numerous studies in which mass media consumption of the “thin ideal body” has been linked to eating disorders among women. Pressure from media has led to women and men internalizing the “thin ideal body” and led to extreme body dissatisfaction which can then lead to eating disorders. While the effect is smaller among men, they are still being subjected to pressure.

Studies have shown “significant change in the weight and size of female and male models portrayed throughout the media in western society and the concept of the ‘perfect or ideal body’.” This explains “why many adolescents are preoccupied with their bodies and dissatisfied with their body image and are willing to try a variety of dangerous weight-loss practices in their quest for the perfect body.”

Most people are usually not aware the amount of manipulation and digital editing done in the fashion industry to create ‘ideal’ female and male bodies. These false images encourage unrealistic and unhealthy standards that are impossible to attain. One study focused on body concerns in girls 16 years old and tried to understand the underlying motivations to be skinny. The element that exerted the largest pressure to be smaller was the media. Another study measured indicators of eating disorders in a population of young Fijian girls after the addition of Western television to their routine. The indicators of eating disorders were exceptionally more prevalent after extended television viewing, demonstrating a negative impact of media. A large component of the data recorded was the theme of subjects describing a new interest in weight loss as a method of modelling themselves after the television characters they viewed.

In order to prevent the effect of social media on disordered eating, here are three tips: choose what media you view and participate in carefully, limit the amount of exposure you have, and test each media’s message for body positivity by asking critical questions about what information they are attempting to spread.

If you or someone you know needs support with their marriage, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/topics/eating-disorders/index.shtml

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792687/

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2792687/

https://www.nationaleatingdisorders.org/media-eating-disorders

Tiggemann M, Gardiner M, Slater A. “I would rather be size 10 than have straight A’s”: A focus group study of adolescent girls’ wish to be thinner. J Adolesc. 2000;23:645–59.

Becker AE, Burwell RA, Gilman SE, Herzog DB, Hamburg P. Eating behaviours and attitudes following exposure to television among ethnic Fijian adolescent girls. Br J Psychiatry. 2002;180:509–14.

Orthorexia Nervosa: an eating disorder in disguise

By Argie Dabrowski

Eating disorders are characterized by unhealthy relationships with food, whether it be excessive or restricted intake or cycles of binging and purging. The most common eating disorders today are anorexia nervosa, bulimia nervosa, and binge eating disorder. Orthorexia nervosa is a proposed eating disorder that, paradoxically, revolves around healthy eating. Orthorexic people are not focused on losing weight. Instead, they are trying to achieve the perfect diet, which they believe will be the solution to all of their problems.

Although not officially recognized by the American Psychiatric Association, orthorexia nervosa has been the topic of many studies and can still be as dangerous as more well-known eating disorders. Those with orthorexia only eat food that fits their standards, such as only containing whole grains or being vegan. This means that they avoid many foods that they see as unclean or unhealthy. Some orthorexic individuals also avoid foods they believe they are allergic too, without actual advice from medical professionals.

At its core, orthorexia is an obsession and those who suffer from it are not simply eating healthy but revolving their entire lives around what and when they eat. Those who have orthorexia have described being completely fixated on food, making it difficult for them to maintain healthy social relationships. These people often avoid social events that involve eating, such as parties, because the food served may not meet their criteria for “healthy” eating. They connect their rigid diet to mortality, as well. Because of this, when failing to meet the standards of their rigid diets, these people feel immense guilt and anxiety.

Besides weight loss, orthorexic people often experience isolation due to the aforementioned social strains. This can lead to depression and further anxiety. Orthorexia nervosa is often clinically treated in a similar manner to anorexia nervosa and obsessive compulsive disorder, which is through exposure to avoided foods.

If you or someone you know needs support for an eating disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com

Sources:
pro.psychcentral.com/3-warning-signs-that-a-patient-might-be-struggling-with-orthorexia/
psychcentral.com/blog/understanding-orthorexia/
pro.psychcentral.com/orthorexia-nervosa-disease-that-masquerades-as-health/
nationaleatingdisorders.org/learn/by-eating-disorder/other/orthorexia

Image Source:
ojo.pe/mujer/el-color-de-los-vegetales-280442-noticia/

Anorexia: Silent Suffering

By: Elyse Ganss

Anorexia nervosa, commonly referred to as anorexia, is an eating disorder that includes symptoms of often an extremely low body weight, a fear of gaining weight, and body dysmorphia. People suffering from anorexia are usually consumed by thoughts of their body image.

Extreme focus on weight and shape is experienced by those who have anorexia. This often leads to a dangerous restriction of calories to lose and restrict weight. Those suffering from anorexia may excessively exercise, consume laxatives, or vomit after eating to stop weight gain. Even when the person suffering from anorexia reaches an extremely thin and unhealthy body weight/shape, they will not stop the restriction of food.

Anorexia can have serious health complications including heart problems, bone loss, infertility, kidney problems, and more. Anorexia is common with people who have perfectionist/high-achieving personality types. People suffering from anorexia feel as though they gain a sense of control by restricting their intake of food.

Anorexia can be undiagnosed for a long time if symptoms are not detected. It is common for people with anorexia to deny their eating disorder and not want to seek help. By meeting with a therapist, treatment plans can be established. Normally this would include a plan to get the person to a healthy weight, finding out what emotional issues the person is having, and changing their thought processes/outlook on their body image.

If you or someone you know needs support for an eating disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/anorexia-nervosa/symptoms-causes/syc=2-353591

https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/eating-disorders/anorexia-nervosa/default.htm

Image Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/science-practice/202002/therapy-can-help-even-those-who-did-not-benefit

Bulimia Nervosa-Learning About Eating Disorders

By: Erika Dino

Bulimia Nervosa

Bulimia Nervosa is an eating disorder that leads you to eating an unusual large amount of food in a repetitive matter. After you do this, there is a behavior done such as vomiting or fasting due to the fact that eating large amounts of food makes you purge secretly. Purging also involves taking laxatives or excessive exercising. Individuals who have Bulimia Nervosa want to lose weight, or are often feeling fear towards gaining weight. They aren’t happy with their weight, because they have feelings of shame. They binge eat, and then purge, usually a few times a week.

Usually this is coexisting with another psychological illness. Examples of this can be anxiety or depression. Bulimia can be caused by stress, dieting, or mixed emotions that can make you feel uncomfortable. Traumatic life events and genetics can also have a part in bulimia nervosa.

Symptoms:

▪Dehydration

▪Laxative abuse causing irritation

▪Inflamed throat

▪ Dental problems

Treatment

▪Psychotherapy

▪Prescribed Medication

▪Cognitive Behavioral Therapy

We can help. We can make the difference. You are a strong individual and there is no reason to doubt it. We will work together, and we will get the best results.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/bulimia-nervosa

Eating Disorders- National Institute of Mental Health

Image: https://comps.canstockphoto.com/bullimia-nervosa-drawing_csp11371809.jpg

If you or someone you know appears to be suffering from Bulimia Nervosa, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Why Dieting May Be Bad For You

Sam Kwok

As the summer months roll around, the amount of social media posts of swimsuit bodies increase. Many people believe that summer is the time for dieting to achieve a perfect body that would be praised by others on social media. To help people lose weight and get into shape, many diet plans have been developed which typically restricts those following the plan from specific food groups. Some of the most common diets are:

  • Keto: low carb, high protein
  • Raw: uncooked food
  • Vegan: no foods that come from animals (ex. Dairy, meat, honey)
  • Paleo: no foods cavemen would not have eaten (ex. Pasta, dairy)
  • Atkins: low carbs
  • Weight Watchers: company meal plan, premade food

Research has shown that healthy lifestyles have been linked to better mental health. Those who eat a balanced diet and exercise daily tend to be happier. Though these diet plans seem to encourage people to make healthy decisions, many of these plans are in fact, the very opposite of healthy as they do not promote a balanced diet. The National Heart Organization recommends that individuals eat approximately 6 servings of grains a day. Those on an Atkins and Keto diet typically eat 0-2 servings. Those following the raw food diet also lack a lot of nutrients that exist in cooked food. Plants have an extra layer within their cells known as cell walls which are meant to help the plant in providing protection and structural support. Some animals like pandas have the ability to break through this cell wall, but humans, do not. The only way for us to break down this cell wall to absorb nutrients is through cooking our vegetables.

There have also been cases of individuals who develop obsessions with diet fads and eventually develop eating disorders. Some common eating disorders are anorexia nervosa and bulimia nervosa. These disorders not only take a huge toll on the body physically, but they also affect the mind psychologically. When trying to get into shape, one should eat a balanced diet and exercise daily, yet many diet plans fail to include such topics. Having a stable sleep schedule as well as maintaining social relationships can affect weight as well as an individual’s esteem and should be taken into consideration when one is attempting to lose weight. Remember, you are what you eat- so eat healthy.

If you or a loved one appears to be suffering from an eating disorder, the licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. Visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ for more information.