Depression in Children: What are the Signs?

By: Sally Santos

In children the most common mental health disorder is depression. When a child is going through depression it may affect their mental and physical health. As mentioned in a Psychology Today article the symptoms “must also interfere with the child’s functioning in normal daily activities.” Since children are still young they are not able to communicate their feelings well to others. Children with depression can be helped that’s why it is important for parents, caregivers and teachers to recognize the signs of depression. Some of the symptoms are:

  • Angry outburst
  • Anxiety
  • Decreased in energy
  • Feelings of hopelessness
  • Lack of concentration
  • Weight loss
  • Insomnia
  • Refusal to go to school

According to the National Alliance of Mental Health “Once a young person has experienced a major depression, he or she is at risk of developing another depression within the next five years.”

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/alphabet-kids/201009/20-signs-and-symptoms-childhoodteen-depression

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/alphabet-kids/201009/depressing-news-about-childhood-and-adolescent-depression

Image:

https://www.anxietymedications.net/childhood-depression-symptoms-and-signs-to-diagnose-stress-on-kids/

If you are a parent and are concerned about your child having depression call the licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

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Depression in Children

By Samantha Glosser

Depressive symptoms in children are often not apparent to parents and teachers. In fact, a new study at the University of Missouri demonstrated that although 30% of 643 children reported feelings of mild to severe depression, parents and teachers often failed to notice symptoms in these children. This could be detrimental to children, because not noticing depressive symptoms can lead to long-term problems caused by depression. In addition, children with depressive symptoms, and depression, can be up to six times more likely to have deficits in social and academic areas.

If parents and teachers identify depressive symptoms as early as possible, it allows the child to work through their academic and social difficulties and prevent further development of depression. To better help our children, it’s important to first understand why symptoms often go unnoticed. This could be because depression in children can appear as irritability, rather than the typical sad mood most people associate with depression. Another reason is that parents and teachers see children in different settings, thus they often come to different conclusions about the presence of depressive symptoms (could be present in school, but not at home). Next, it’s important to become familiar with symptoms of depression. Parents and teachers should be looking for the following signs: feelings of sadness or loneliness, feelings of hopelessness, lack of energy, loss of pleasure and interest in activities, difficulties eating or sleeping, difficulties concentrating, feelings of guilt/worthlessness, and even thoughts of death or suicide.

If you or someone you know appears to be suffering from depression, the licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Source: Pedersen, Traci. “Depressed Kids Far More Likely to Have Social, Academic Deficits.” Psych Central, 30 Aug. 2018, psychcentral.com/news/2018/08/30/depressed-kids-far-more-likely-to-have-social-academic-deficits/138292.html.

Divorce: Trust in Children

child

Divorce: Trust in Children

By: Daniela Chica

Although only 1/3 of marriages experience marital issues and end in divorce, the toll that it takes on all members of the family is undeniable. Children in particular bear the brunt of the issues as they are often left feeling hopeless and untrusting. When going through a divorce, children can often lose confidence in their parents as well as pick up various deceitful or contradictory behaviors. While they can lose trust in their parents, they can also experience problems forming bonds or intimate relationships in the future. There are various things you can do to ensure that your children continue to experience a loving, caring and trusting environment after or during a divorce:

  • Do not make promises you can’t keep
  • Speak with your kids about age appropriate topics regarding the divorce
  • Allow your kids to express their feelings and aid them in the process
  • Connect with your kids using entertaining activities
  • Be physically and emotionally involved
  • Show your kids lots of unconditional love

Growing up with divorced parents can be difficult, but it’s not impossible for children to learn how to trust others and themselves again if they experience positive environments. It’s never too late to ensure that your children feel trust and confidence in their parents.

If you and your spouse are experiencing marital difficulties or your child is experiencing depression or anxiety, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/age-un-innocence/201610/trust-children-divorce