Parental Alienation Syndrome

By: Elyse Ganss

Parental alienation syndrome occurs when a child’s parent unconsciously works to turn the child against the other parent. This commonly occurs during divorce or custody battles. When saying negative things about the other parent, like blaming the other parent for their breakup, alienation turns the child against the other parent. Strategies can include brainwashing, alienating, and programming to cause distance between a child and parent. This behavior has negative effects for the relationship of the child and the other parent and can cause permanent damage.

The parent who unconsciously tries to turn the child against the other parent often exhibits narcissistic characteristics or tendencies in line with borderline personality disorder and are more concerned with their own feelings rather than the child’s well-being. Feelings that may be driving the parent’s behavior are anger and jealousy. Children benefit from the presence of both parents, unless a parent is abusive, and through parental alienation syndrome, children may become estranged from a parent.

If you have been experiencing anger about your co-parenting relationship and have been consciously or unconsciously taking it out on your child, you may be causing parental alienation syndrome. Children being alienated may experience anger, feelings of neglect, exhibit destructive behavior, and lack empathy. It is important to remember that no matter what you are feeling toward your former spouse, your child should not be brought into your separation, divorce, or custody battle. Supporting a child is the most important thing to do during a breakup and it may be helpful to bring the child to therapy to work through their emotions to prevent psychological damage.

If you or someone you know needs support, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/resolution-not-conflict/201802/parental-alienation-syndrome-what-is-it-and-who-does-it

https://www.healthline.com/health/childrens-health/parental-alienation-syndrome#effects-on-child

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https://www.healthline.com/health/childrens-health/parental-alienation-syndrome

Family Therapy

By: Elyse Ganss

Family therapy is a type of counseling where family members participate to deal with prior issues or conflicts and improve communication. Family members do not need to be blood related and can simply be long-term support members.

Family therapy may be necessary during short term increments when a particular problem occurs. Through improving communication, families will gain the necessary skills to deal with issues that come up in their lives. However, sometimes long-term family therapy can be needed. For example, a family dealing with the loss of a loved one may need counseling services for a long period as the process of grieving is different for each family.

Some common things addressed during family therapy include different parenting styles, financial conflicts, sexual issues, conflict between parents and children, substance abuse and mental illness. Similarly, anger or grief can be addressed during family therapy. Positive outcomes of family therapy include communication, reduced family conflict, improved family cohesion, and better problem-solving ability.

During family therapy, a therapist talks to the couple both together and alone as needed. Then, the therapist will talk to each member of the family to learn what is going on. After this a treatment plan will be created and the therapist will work with the family to meet their goals.

If you or someone you know is interested in family therapy, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

Sources:

https://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/family-therapy/about/pac-20385237

https://www.webmd.com/parenting/family-therapy-overview#1

Image Source: https://www.arkansasrelationshipcenter.com/the-most-common-issues-seen-in-family-therapy-sessions

Stress: Caregiver Stress

Stress: Caregiver Stress

By Lauren Hernandez

Caregiving is the responsibility to provide unpaid care for an adult or child which may involve shopping, housekeeping, toilet assistance, bathing, coordinating medical treatments, and managing a person’s finances. One of the main struggles a caregiver must learn to cope with is that caregiving is a 24/7 job, in addition to any other professional or personal endeavors that person is pursuing. While the patient is most commonly a loved one and family member, the caregiver must remember to take care of themselves. Additionally, a caregivers’ own health and daily needs are oftentimes neglected and this can be detrimental to that individual’s well-being. “Caregiver stress” is when caregiving becomes too overwhelming.

The most common feelings associated with caregiver stress include:

  • Exhaustion
  • Frustration
  • Loneliness
  • Guilt
  • Anger
  • Burden, feeling of weight on your shoulders
  • Anxiety

It is important to remind a caregiver to set aside time for themselves, to focus on their own mental and physical health, as well as other pressing needs. Meditation, reading, and yoga are a few ways in which a caregiver can relax. It would also be helpful to seek other forms of aid for that patient, whether that be the help of other family members, daily visits from nurses, or considering putting your loved one into a nursing or residential assisted living home so they can be cared for 24/7 by professionals. However, if you or someone you know is struggling due to being a caregiver, consider reaching out to a mental health professional for some coping mechanisms.

 

 

If you or someone you know is struggling with the stress of caregiving, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

 

 

Sources: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/basics/caregiving

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/adventures-in-old-age/200904/caregiver-stress-would-you-some-angst-sandwich-generation

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Depression and Empty Nest Syndrome

Depression and Empty Nest Syndrome

Depression and Empty Nest Syndrome

By: Lauren Hernandez

                It’s about time that college students may return back to their parent’s home for the summer. At first, many parents are excited for their children to go to college or begin their professional career, however, it is common for parents to feel sad, lonely, and experience grief when their children leave their childhood home. Typically women will struggle more than men during these times, especially when women were full-time mothers. It is important to know that Empty Nest Syndrome is a transitional period in life rather than a clinical disorder or diagnosis. Although the change brings about conflicting emotions, parents are encouraged to support their children in the gradual process towards adulthood.

Symptoms of Empty Nest Syndrome:

  • Sadness
  • Excessive crying
  • Loss
  • Depression
  • Loneliness
  • Distress
  • A loss of purpose and meaning in life

 

If you or someone you know is experiencing the feelings associated with Empty Nest Syndrome, it is important to refocus your lifestyle and relationships with those living with you. Ways to cope with Empty Nest symptoms include starting new hobbies such as reading, golfing, listening to podcasts, or starting yoga classes. Activities like these may force you to leave the house and engage in a stimulating action which can relieve depressive symptoms and allow you to find something new to put your energy into.

If you or someone you know is struggling with Empty Nest Syndrome, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

 

 

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/conditions/empty-nest-syndrome

 

Image Source:

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