Depression and Empty Nest Syndrome

Depression and Empty Nest Syndrome

Depression and Empty Nest Syndrome

By: Lauren Hernandez

                It’s about time that college students may return back to their parent’s home for the summer. At first, many parents are excited for their children to go to college or begin their professional career, however, it is common for parents to feel sad, lonely, and experience grief when their children leave their childhood home. Typically women will struggle more than men during these times, especially when women were full-time mothers. It is important to know that Empty Nest Syndrome is a transitional period in life rather than a clinical disorder or diagnosis. Although the change brings about conflicting emotions, parents are encouraged to support their children in the gradual process towards adulthood.

Symptoms of Empty Nest Syndrome:

  • Sadness
  • Excessive crying
  • Loss
  • Depression
  • Loneliness
  • Distress
  • A loss of purpose and meaning in life

 

If you or someone you know is experiencing the feelings associated with Empty Nest Syndrome, it is important to refocus your lifestyle and relationships with those living with you. Ways to cope with Empty Nest symptoms include starting new hobbies such as reading, golfing, listening to podcasts, or starting yoga classes. Activities like these may force you to leave the house and engage in a stimulating action which can relieve depressive symptoms and allow you to find something new to put your energy into.

If you or someone you know is struggling with Empty Nest Syndrome, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

 

 

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/conditions/empty-nest-syndrome

 

Image Source:

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Mindfulness: What is it, and does it really work?

Mindfulness: What is it, and does it really work?

By: Lauren Hernandez

In this busy, technology filled day and age, it is difficult for people to remove themselves from the stress of work and money, family and friends, and to disconnect from the 24/7 social frenzy that is social media. Now more than ever it is imperative that people begin to step back from their phones and computer screens to take care of their mental health and general wellbeing. One fairly new and unique way is mindfulness meditation.

What is mindfulness you may ask? Mindfulness is a process in which you have full and total awareness of the present moment. It has been proven that mindfulness reduces feelings of anxiety and depression and improves one’s mental health.

Here are some simple tips to begin practicing mindfulness on your own:

  • Bring your attention to your breathing. Feel your breath filling your lungs and the warm exhale of air leaving your body.
  • Notice changes in your posture and maintain awareness of current bodily sensations
  • Allow yourself to disconnect from all forms of technology
  • Take time to listen and to observe what is happening around you
  • If you get distracted bring your attention back to your natural breathing patterns

If you feel as though you may need help practicing mindfulness or have questions about the way you are feeling, contact a mental health professional such as a psychologist who can offer some guidance.

 

If you or someone you know is seeking guidance in practicing mindfulness, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/ .

 

Source:

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/happiness/what-is-mindfulness-meditation-the-mental-health-trend-thats-changing-the-way-we-work-relax-and-sleep-%e2%80%93-explained-by-a-psychologist/ar-AABonMO

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Social Anxiety: Phone Calls

Social Anxiety: Phone Calls

By Toniann Seals

Does calling a restaurant to order food make you sick to your stomach? Do you have a fear of jobs whose expectations include answering phones? There is a good chance that you may have some form of social anxiety in relation to phone call phobias.

While you are on the phone do you:

  • Shake?
  • Feel your heart racing?
  • Feel anxious?

Ways to handle a call and address issues when you suffer from social anxiety disorder:

  • Practice your call in a mirror
    • Talk to yourself before you talk to someone else.
  • Write a script
    • It is okay to have exactly what you want to say right in front of you. This can alleviate your social anxiety.
  • Post it notes
    • If you are doing a phone interview or at work, write a cheat sheet with common phone numbers, email addresses, resume details and facts that will come up frequently.
  • Speak slowly and calmly
    • Remind yourself that you do not need to rush. Take your time!
  • Let an incoming call go to voicemail
    • Voicemail is an option for a reason. If you are feeling exceptionally worried, take a moment and let it go to voicemail. You can always call back when you are ready.

If you or someone you know suffers from social anxiety speak with one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists. Contact us at our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 respectively to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:

https://www.verywellmind.com/afraid-making-phone-calls-tips-3024317

(Image) https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2016/04/the-life-and-death-of-the-prank-phone-call/476340/