Divorce: Trust in Children

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Divorce: Trust in Children

By: Daniela Chica

Although only 1/3 of marriages experience marital issues and end in divorce, the toll that it takes on all members of the family is undeniable. Children in particular bear the brunt of the issues as they are often left feeling hopeless and untrusting. When going through a divorce, children can often lose confidence in their parents as well as pick up various deceitful or contradictory behaviors. While they can lose trust in their parents, they can also experience problems forming bonds or intimate relationships in the future. There are various things you can do to ensure that your children continue to experience a loving, caring and trusting environment after or during a divorce:

  • Do not make promises you can’t keep
  • Speak with your kids about age appropriate topics regarding the divorce
  • Allow your kids to express their feelings and aid them in the process
  • Connect with your kids using entertaining activities
  • Be physically and emotionally involved
  • Show your kids lots of unconditional love

Growing up with divorced parents can be difficult, but it’s not impossible for children to learn how to trust others and themselves again if they experience positive environments. It’s never too late to ensure that your children feel trust and confidence in their parents.

If you and your spouse are experiencing marital difficulties or your child is experiencing depression or anxiety, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/age-un-innocence/201610/trust-children-divorce

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Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

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Generalized Anxiety Disorder (GAD)

By Emily Aranda

Anxiety manifests itself in many forms and can be triggered by many stimuli. It is common to think of anxiety as stress that is tied to a situation, person, place, etc. of which rationally causes one anxiety, but generalized anxiety disorder is different. Generalized anxiety is not tethered to a physical or metaphysical thing; rather, it is free floating, does not require a trigger, and is not necessarily rational. Generalized anxiety is excessive, chronic, and interferes with one’s lifestyle. It affects 6.8 million US adults (3.1% of the US population) and is most commonly found in women. It is possible to develop generalized anxiety as a child or as an adult. Those with GAD tend to worry about the same topics as their peers, but to a disproportionate degree.

The mental symptoms of GAD are as follows:

  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Persistent worrying or obsessing
  • Inability to relax or let things go
  • Distress about decision making
  • imagining every option in a situation all the way out to its possible negative conclusion
  • feeling anxiety without an apparent cause

GAD does not only involve excessive worry. GAD involves physical symptoms as well. The following is a list of the physical implications of GAD:

  • Trouble sleeping, staying asleep
  • Hypertension in muscles
  • Fatigue
  • Irritability
  • Trembling
  • Inappropriate sweating
  • Nausea, diarrhea, and irritable bowel syndrome

Generalized Anxiety Disorder is a debilitating condition that can be addressed by a professional. If you or someone you know is having issues with Generalized Anxiety Disorder, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

 

Source:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/generalized-anxiety-disorder/basics/symptoms/con-20024562

Good Grief: Part 2

By: Sam Reiner

(Read part 1 first to learn why I am talking about Zelda)

The 1st stage of grief is Denial. When you first learn of a loss it’s normal to think that it isn’t real or that it can’t be happening. It’s a way for you to deal with the torrent of overwhelming emotions. This is exactly what you experience in Clock Town, the 1st town in Majora’s Mask. In this game, you have 3 days to stop a giant moon from crashing down and destroying everything. However, even with this moon clearly inching closer every minute, no one seems to care. In fact, they are actually planning a carnival, openly laughing at the idea that the moon will fall. One person even goes as far to say that he’ll simply cut the moon to pieces with his sword.

Denial can only be temporary however, and when it is no longer possible you get angry. Stage 2: Anger. When reality starts to set in you may feel frustrated and helpless which later turn to anger, causing you to lash out at anything whether they deserve it or not. This is extremely prevalent in the game’s second location, Woodfall. Here you discover that the swamp has been poisoned, the Deku princess is missing, and the king is dead set on punishing a monkey who he believes kidnapped her. The problem is, the monkey is innocent. The king is just angry because of the poisoned swamp and his missing daughter and is lashing out at anyone.

Once the anger settles you then start to feel desperate which leads to stage 3: Bargaining. It’s during this stage you attempt to do anything that can either postpone or reverse the loss. In the case of Majora’s Mask, bargaining is on full display at Snowhead. Here is where the player encounters the Gorons, who are in the middle of mourning the recent loss of their chief, Darmani. Eventually you actually meet his ghost who then literally begs you to bring him back to life with your magic. This is a textbook example of bargaining as he is trying everything to delay the inevitability that is death. This can also be seen in the area itself. The paralyzing cold of Snowhead is basically a metaphor to how in this stage of grief you feel unable to move on, emotionally frozen. And for now, I’ll stop there, so for the next part we will be discussing the last two stages of grief.

If you or someone you know is grieving, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

 

Good Grief: Part 1

By: Sam Reiner

Grief is something that is inevitable in everyone’s life. It is an emotion that can come from the loss of a loved one, moving to a new home, suffering a chronic illness, or even the end of a relationship. It is a feeling that hits hard and can make you feel completely empty inside. Although we all must face grief at one point or another, no one knows what to expect when they are actually faced with it. What will I feel, how long will I feel it, and how can I move on? Over the next few blogs I will try my best to answer these questions.

So, let’s go down the list and start with what exactly will you feel when you are face with grief. Although the process is different for everyone, doctors have identified 5 common stages of grief: Denial, Anger, Bargaining, Depression, Acceptance (DABDA). Now in order to explain it further I’m going to once again use a video game, this time Legend of Zelda: Majora’s Mask. I swear I didn’t even plan this but when it comes to examples of the 5 stages of grief this is probably the best example of it in pop culture as you actually play through all 5 stages of grief via the 5 locations. But I’m going to have so go into more detail on it another day. This is going to take a while to explain and deserves its own blog. In the next part I will be discussing the first three stages of grief.

If you or someone you know is grieving, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Social Anxiety

social anxiety

Social Anxiety

By Daisy Lee

A common type of anxiety disorder is known as social anxiety disorder, or social phobia. Many anxiety disorders are characterized by an extreme fear of a certain type of object or situation. In the case of social anxiety, a person has an extreme fear of and avoidance of social situations or situations involving people who may be watching or judging them. Often, this intense anxiety in social situations can interfere with one’s social, educational, and/or occupational functioning and can even prevent people from going to school or work. Many people with social anxiety might avoid going out and socializing in order to avoid experiencing potential anxiety and stress. Social anxiety can also make one reluctant to meet new people, which is why many with social anxiety may not have a large circle of friends and may also have trouble making new friends. When people with social anxiety find themselves in a situation in which they have to socialize or have to put on a performance or presentation, they commonly experience these symptoms:

  • Intense anxiety and distress
  • Blushing, sweating, and trembling
  • Rapid heart rate
  • Nausea or upset stomach
  • Rigid body posture
  • Poor eye contact
  • Voice tremors

Social anxiety disorder is often heritable and can be effectively treated. Certain forms of psychotherapy, specifically cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), can be a very effective treatment for social anxiety. Certain antidepressants such as selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can also be helpful. If you or someone you know is struggling with social anxiety, speak with one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists. They can help you overcome this often debilitating anxiety. Contact us at our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 respectively to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/social-anxiety-disorder-social-phobia

Photo: https://www.pinterest.com/explore/social-anxiety/

 

Suicide Prevention the Right Way: Part 2

By: Sam Reiner

(cont from part 1)

That’s basically the whole article and after reading this you’re probably thinking “why would I ever show this to someone who is thinking of suicide?” Well although what he talks about may seem like the worst thing to tell people it’s in the details that makes the article really stick out. Like I said before, when Wong mentions the possibility of the afterlife he says your two options are one of the worst parts of hell or eternal nothingness. It is a scientific fact that something is always better than nothing so the downside of nothing for eternity is never explained but when he talks about Hell it is a different story. After he is done describing all the terrible things Hell has in store for the rest of eternity he brings up the fact that there are people who have it worse than you do.

Remember how I said that Wong mentions a kid with a rare skin disease. This kid’s skin is constantly drying and falling off in chunks so you would think that he might be the most likely to commit suicide because he is in constant pain. But instead, he is also over 18 years old and runs triathlons. Although it may seem random to talk about, Wong only mentions him to make a good point, if he can find a reason to live so can you. The main point of this whole section is, “if you’re figuring that, yes, you can man up and face whatever challenges the next life presents, then you might as well do that now, in this life, and skip the extra step. It’s just more efficient that way.”

Same goes for when he describes suicide methods. Like last time I don’t want to be specific on this topic but every method that he mentions is put in a way that would dissuade anyone from trying it. To me however the best part of this article is in the 3rd section, Timing. This is the section where the article really shines as it is here that Wong not only uses common sense, but statistics too when he talks about the 50% Rule. Why is the fact he uses statistics so important? It’s because that is definitive proof that you have something to look forward to and that you have a purpose. Also, when he talks about revising your suicide note, he recommends asking the suicide hotline to do it for you as they “deal with dozens of suicides every day and they know a good note when they hear one,” (very funny Wong). Honestly, I want to go into so much more detail on this article, especially the 50% Rule, but I feel as though the only way to truly see why I love this article so much is to read it. So, I’m going to put the link at the end and I really suggest you read it. I guarantee it will have you thinking differently.

http://www.cracked.com/article_15658_the-ten-minute-suicide-guide.html

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

By: Christina Mesa

Anxiety is something that people experience in their daily lives. What characterizes Generalized Anxiety Disorder from normal anxiety is that it is chronic and the anxiety is often brought upon without a specific reason.  The worry you experience can interfere with aspects of your daily life, such as work and relationships.  Generalized Anxiety Disorder affects 6.8 million Americans and affects twice as many women as men.

Symptoms of GAD include:

  • Fatigue
  • Inability to control excessive worrying
  • Expect the worst
  • Restlessness/irritability
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Muscle tension
  • Difficulty with falling asleep, staying asleep, or unsatisfying sleep

Risk Factors include:

  • Shyness
  • Being divorced or widowed
  • Having few economic resources
  • Stressful life events in childhood and adulthood
  • Family history of anxiety disorders

If you or a loved one appears to be suffering from postpartum depression, licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/generalized-anxiety-disorder

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What is it?

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What is it?

By: Daniela Chica

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by prolonged intervals of repetitious and undesired thoughts and compulsions. About 2.2 million Americans live with OCD and 1/3 of people who develop the disorder first experience symptoms as children. Obsessive compulsive disorder can be a lifelong condition if left untreated and it can limit people’s ability to function in everyday life. Because OCD is an anxiety disorder, deviating from usual compulsions and obsessions can cause great distress. Some common symptoms of OCD are:

  • Having repetitive thoughts or urges about a wide range of issues such as neatness, germs or violence
  • Engaging in repetitious behavior such as washing one’s hands, hoarding, or locking doors
  • Getting no satisfaction from engaging in one’s repetitious behavior, but still getting some form of relief from the anxiety caused by obsessive thoughts
  • Spending at least an hour daily on repetitious behaviors and thoughts that affect one’s normal functioning

Although there is still much to know about obsessive compulsive disorder, researchers believe that biological factors increase the risk of developing the disorder. One is also more likely to develop the disorder if a first degree relative is diagnosed with the disorder. Abuse in childhood and trauma of any sort are often linked to OCD.

If you or someone you know has obsessive compulsive disorder and needs help, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/obsessive-compulsive-disorder

Marijuana: Negative Effects in Teens

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Marijuana: Negative Effects in Teens

By: Daniela Chica

Most people fall under the misconception that marijuana use is not harmful to the body. However, current studies show that due to the increasing concentration of THC, the psychoactive chemical in marijuana, people have been experiencing withdrawal symptoms which are the possible sign of a physical dependence. Studies also show that there are increasing signs of psychological dependence in teens that use marijuana to cope with their adolescent fears and emotions. Rather than turning towards effective coping methods, they turn to the drug to give them comfort.

Marijuana also has negative effects on the heart and lungs of adolescents who use it. Although most marijuana smokers believe they’re not under the same risks as cigarette smokers, studies show that those who are regular marijuana smokers develop the same lung infections and other respiratory problems as cigarette smokers do. The hearts of regular marijuana smokers are also at risk. Studies show that smokers have a 4.8% increase in the risk of heart attack within the first hour of smoking marijuana.

If you or someone you know is experiencing problems with addiction of any sort, the psychologists and psychiatrists at Arista Counseling can help you. For more information about our center and our services please contact our Paramus, NJ office at 201-368-3700 or our Manhattan, NY office at 212-722-1920 to set up an appointment.

Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/face-it/201302/latest-news-about-teen-marijuana-use

Depression: Signs and Symptoms

Depression: Signs and Symptoms

By Daisy Lee

One of the most common mental health or mood disorders is one known as major depressive disorder, or more simply, depression. Although depression is not rare in the general population and awareness of it has been increasing, many people still struggle to spot depression. A lot of times, people can mistake depression for simply being tired or sad.

Depression can encompass many different characteristics, not all of which may manifest in a single person. For example, one person who is clinically depressed may have significant weight loss without intention while another person who is clinically depressed may have significant weight gain. The symptoms of depression are not always clear-cut. Here are a few common symptoms of depression:

  • Diminished interest or pleasure in activities
  • Significant weight loss or weight gain; increase or decrease in appetite
  • Insomnia (inability to sleep or stay asleep) or hypersomnia (sleeping too much)
  • Psychomotor agitation or retardation (slowed down movements)
  • Fatigue, lethargy, or loss of energy
  • Feelings of worthlessness or excessive/inappropriate guilt
  • Diminished ability to think or concentrate
  • Recurrent thoughts of death or suicidal ideation

As mentioned before, depression can be difficult to spot, even if you are familiar with the symptoms and what depression encompasses. If you or someone you know might be struggling with depression, speak with one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists. Contact us at our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 respectively to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source: https://psychcentral.com/disorders/depression/depression-symptoms-major-depressive-disorder/

Photo: https://themighty.com/2015/12/video-for-anyone-who-doesnt-believe-depression-is-a-medical-condition/