COVID-19 and Teletherapy

COVID-19 and Teletherapy
By Kaitlyn Choi

COVID-19 most certainly has impacted not only the mundane aspects of our everyday lives but also the essential delivery of health care services. This is a significant transition for all health care providers and patients. For those who had been receiving therapy or counseling, the pandemic caused a major increase in the shift from in-person to phone therapy.

Although teletherapy may seem out of the ordinary, there are many advantages to being able to access health care services through the internet or phone. First of all, by staying at home, patients can avoid health risks. It is crucial that we take caution of the virus; this is a perfect way to stay safe while receiving quality care. Furthermore, it is simply convenient. There is no need to physically come to the office or schedule an appointment according to travel availability. Thus there is increased flexibility with appointments, according to the patient’s needs and comfort. Patients can even have sessions while they are away from home or on vacation. This is great for individuals who are busy or unavailable for long periods of time.

Many might be wondering if the quality of therapy or health care services changes with the shift from in-person counseling to telehealth. In fact, it was proven that cognitive behavioral therapy and other forms of treatment are equally effective when administered via telephone as it is when administered face-to-face. In other words, telehealth is both valuable and convenient.

This might be a great time to seek therapy if you have been hesitating. With teletherapy available for all individuals, you can receive quality mental health care in the comfort of your own home.

If you or someone you know needs help with anxiety, panic attacks, fatigue, or lack of motivation, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources:
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/social-instincts/202003/will-covid-19-make-teletherapy-the-rule-not-the-exception
https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/think-well/202008/10-advantages-teletherapy

Image Source:
https://www.consumerreports.org/mental-health/how-to-find-affordable-mental-teletherapy/

Borderline Personality Disorder: Misdiagnosed

Borderline Personality Disorder: Misdiagnosed

By Zoe Alekel

When struggling with your mental health, the last thing you want to hear from a doctor or therapist is that they don’t think anything is wrong. It can leave you confused, lost, hopeless, and alone. Borderline Personality Disorder (BPD) often goes undiagnosed or misdiagnosed because of the disorder’s symptoms and stigma. According to the Mayo Clinic symptoms of borderline personality disorder include:

  • Intense fear of abandonment—including real or imagined separation/ rejection
  • Feelings of depression, anxiety, and hopelessness
  • Unstable relationships—idealizing someone one moment, then suddenly believing they don’t care or that they are cruel
  • Distorted view of self and self-image—including dissociation (feeling as if you don’t exist at all or if the moment in time isn’t real)
  • Impulsive and risky behavior—including rebellion, drug abuse, reckless driving, sudden decision making, unsafe sex and promiscuity, and sabotaging success or personal relationships
  • Suicidal thoughts, threats, or behavior or self-injury, often in response to fear of separation or rejection
  • Mood swings lasting from a few hours to a few days— including intense happiness, irritability, shame or anxiety
  • Inappropriate, intense anger—losing temper easily, acting out, intense irritability

The symptoms for BPD often look like other mental health conditions—contributing to misdiagnosis or lack of diagnosis. Sometimes BPD has similar patterns and symptoms as bipolar disorder, which can also include severe mood swings. One study shows that 40% of people, who only met the criteria for BPD, were still misdiagnosed with Bipolar Type 2; which is likely due to the overlapping and similar symptoms of each disorder.

Another reason why BPD can go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed is because of the myth that teens can’t have BPD. Many of the symptoms of BPD can be seen as “typical teenage behavior” as this is a crucial time in an adolescent’s life when they are developing personality and identity. Diagnosing younger adolescents with BPD is often avoided because of the stigma attached to the diagnosis. Some clinicians may fear that the client’s symptoms may only worsen with a BPD diagnosis. This can be very dangerous and harmful to the client who is not accurately being diagnosed, especially because it limits the resources they can receive for help.

BPD does not only appear in a specific age group or gender, and sometime can mirror other diagnoses or the experience of a typical adolescent. Health professionals and advocates must continue to educate and understand the reality of BPD, and know when to properly diagnose so their client can receive the help they need.

If you or someone you know is struggling with borderline personality disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources: https://nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/October-2017/Why-Borderline-Personality-Disorder-is-Misdiagnose

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/borderline-personality-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20370237

Image source: https://wakeup-world.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/01/Genie-in-a-Bottle-The-Spiritual-Gift-of-Borderline-Personality-Disorder-1.jpg

Hypnotherapy

Hypnotherapy
By: Emma Yasukawa

Hypnosis, also known as hypnotherapy, has become a popular practice in today’s modern medicine and is used to treat many different medical and psychological conditions. Hypnosis uses guided relaxation, deep concentration and the individual’s full undivided attention to allow them to reach a heightened state of awareness that is also known as a trance. The purpose of this deep trance is to enable the individual to dive into the subconscious part of the brain and explore painful thoughts, feelings and memories that they may have pushed down and ‘forgotten’ about. When a person is under hypnosis, they are usually more open to suggestions due to feeling extremely calm and relaxed. Hypnotherapy can be used to treat anxiety, phobias, substance abuse, sexual dysfunctions; bad habits including smoking, nail biting, overeating etc., and in some cases, allow individuals to perceive feelings differently, such as blocking out awareness of pain.

There are many different ways that hypnotherapy can be administered but typically, clinical hypnotherapy is generally performed in a relaxed, calm therapeutic environment. A trained therapist will guide the individual into a relaxed, focused state and ask the patient to think about situations and experiences in a positive way that can help them change their perspective and the way that they may think or behave.

If you or someone you know is struggling and may be open to hypnotherapy, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com


References:
https://www.webmd.com/mental-health/mental-health-hypnotherapy#1 https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/therapy-types/hypnotherapy
Image Source: https://woolpit-complementary.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/Hypnotherapy.jpg

Social Anxiety: Struggling to Reach Out

            It’s okay to want to be alone, but many people around the world resort to solidarity because they fear they’ll be judged by others in a social scene. Social anxiety disorder, or social phobia, is a mental illness categorized as a type of anxiety disorder that consists of an intense, persistent fear of being watched and/or judged by others. No matter what the situation is, if it involves other people, things become more challenging for them. It feels as though all eyes are on them and they’re terrified of making a spectacle of themselves in front of those around them, even friends and family. That’s why it tends to be a struggle for many sufferers of social anxiety to maintain any healthy relationships because they would rather push people away and avoid conversation than take the risk of feeling humiliated through judgment.

          The toll social anxiety has on some of its sufferers can lead to avoiding school and work as well as dropping many hobbies/activities all together because they’re simply too terrified to engage. In such instances, the disorder becomes a hindrance to everyday life because if they miss school and work, they’re losing out on education, money, and many other key things to sustain healthy living. Some signs that you may be suffering from social anxiety disorder are: when having to be around others; feeling nauseous or sick to your stomach, blushing, sweating or trembling, making little eye contact and speaking very softly, staying away from places where you see other people, etc. In this case, treatment comes in the form of psychotherapy, medication, or both. Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) is perhaps the most common form of treatment and teaches patients better ways of thinking and reacting to anxiety-inducing scenarios in order to best keep those unwanted emotions under control.

If you or someone you know is struggling with a mental illness, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources: https://www.nimh.nih.gov/health/publications/social-anxiety-disorder-more-than-just-shyness/index.shtml

PTSD in Women

By: Catherine Cain

Experiencing trauma is common and sometimes it may develop into PTSD, or post-traumatic stress disorder. While PTSD does affect men and women, women are significantly more likely to experience it than men. So, what is PTSD?

Post-traumatic stress disorder develops after someone experiences or witnesses a traumatic event, and the symptoms caused by this trauma continue for more than a month. While PTSD usually develops in the month following the event, it may develop months or even years after. Symptoms of PTSD include intrusive memories, avoidance of anything or anyone that reminds them of the trauma, changes in mood or thinking, and changed in behavior.

Females are twice as likely to experience PTSD as men. Why is that? While exposure to trauma is lower for women than men the type of trauma is significant in the development of PTSD. Men experience traumas that result in injuries or death, such as accidents, combats, and physical assaults. Women, however, experience childhood abuse, rape, and sexual assault. The effects of sexual assault are so detrimental that in the 2 weeks following an incident of sexual assault, 94% of women experienced symptoms of PTSD.

Another key reason for this difference is the difference in coping strategies. Everyone has heard of the “fight or flight” response to dangerous situations, but it is found that women often use the “tend and befriend” response following an event. “Tending” is taking care of those around you, while “befriending” is reaching out to others for support. Because of this reliance on others, women become more vulnerable to PTSD symptoms if their support system fails them.

If you or someone you know is struggling with Post Traumatic Stress Disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources: https://www.nami.org/Blogs/NAMI-Blog/October-2019/PTSD-is-More-Likely-in-Women-Than-Men https://www.womenshealth.gov/mental-health/mental-health-conditions/post-traumatic-stress-disorder

Addiction: Supporting My Adult Child Through Addiction

Addiction: Supporting My Adult Child Through Addiction
By Emma Yasukawa

Being a parent means that your children always come first and from a young age, you teach them to make good decisions because children form plenty of life decisions on their own. For example, there are plenty of adult children who make the decision on whether or not they will try drugs or alcohol; even after hearing all of the possible side-effects and risks of addiction. This decision ultimately has an effect on parents and may leave them second-guessing their parenting skills and whether or not they did something wrong as parents.

If you are a parent of an adult child who is not making good decisions and their future seems uncertain, this can be a heavy burden on you. You must take a deep breath and remind yourself that your child is no longer your responsibility legally, and that they inevitably chose this path. Though, there are a few ways that a parent can help their adult child dealing with addiction:

1. Adult children who are addicted to a substance tend to feel as if the whole world is against them and that they feel as if they ‘had no other choice.’ As a parent it is important to remind your child that it was their conscious decision that leads them to where they are. Ultimately, this can remind them that they always have a choice and that it is not too late to seek help.

2. As a parent, you will always want to support your child emotionally and financially if needed. It is a parent’s heart to want to always help, but sometimes you are causing more harm than good. It is important to offer assistance and support but only to the degree that you are able to, and knowing that it is actually bettering your child’s future.

3. Love your child. Love comes in many different forms and sometimes integrating tough love is the best kind of love. This means holding him/her accountable for their behavior, and possibly setting up an intervention if needed.

4. While it is easy for the addicted child to become the center of attention, it is important to not allow this to affect the rest of your family. Of course it will be on everyone’s mind but, it should not get to the point where it will split up a family.

If you or someone you know is struggling with addiction, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com

Resources: https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/lifetime-connections/201410/7-tips-mothers-adult-addicts

Image Source: https://vertavahealth.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/07/Addictioncampuses.com-Getting-Help-For-An-Adult-Child-Addicted-To-Drugs-And-Alcohol.jpg
 

Alcohol Use Increased During Pandemic

Alcohol Use Increased During Pandemic

By: Nicolette Ferrante

Since the pandemic began alcohol sales have greatly increased. People are turning to alcohol as a way to cope with the anxiety and stress of quarantine and dealing with the pandemic. There is so much unknown at this time; not knowing if you will lose your job, not knowing when you can see your family and friends again and not knowing when this will end.

            People are working from home and self-isolating which leads to the feeling of loneliness and boredom. Drinking is beginning to become a part of people’s daily routine. Excessive drinking is an unhealthy habit that could lead to liver failure, heart disease, breast cancer, depression and more.  

Some signs to watch out for are:

  • An increase in alcohol consumption
  • Concerns expressed by loved ones
  • Change in sleeping patterns-sleeping more or less than normal
  • Binge drinking
  • Craving alcohol

If you think your drinking is a problem or you find yourself drinking excessively, turn to a psychologist to express your concerns. They can help you cut down and monitor your drinking. 

If you or someone you know needs support for alcoholism or substance abuse, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Anxiety: Feeling Anxious Returning to Work During a Pandemic?

Feeling Anxious Returning to Work During a Pandemic?
By Emma Yasukawa

As the state reopens, many workers can finally return back to their jobs. With that being said, there are many people who are dreading the thought of having to return back to their job after working remotely for months. Adapting to any sort of change takes a little bit of getting used to, but when you add the risk of possibly contracting COVID-19, anxiety levels are heightened.

If you are feeling anxious about returning to work after a mandatory quarantine, you should not feel alone, and there are ways to overcome your anxieties. Talking about your feelings is important, whether or not it is to your colleagues or manager, because chances are you are not the only one who is feeling anxious. See if you can come up with a solution with your boss. Maybe they can suggest only coming in a few days a week for the first couple of weeks to help ease your anxiety. It is important to keep in mind that businesses are also following the new COVID-19 guidelines in order to protect the safety of their workers.

Getting into a routine is another way to help reduce anxiety levels significantly. Due to the COVID lockdown, it has thrown off many individuals daily routines. It is important to give yourself a week, or even a few, to get back into a healthy sleep schedule, exercising and eating correctly. Doing all of this will improve your anxiety levels and help you feel more prepared for what is to come.

Be kind to yourself. It is hard transitioning from doing nothing all day and having zero responsibilities, to working a full 9-5 schedule, Monday through Friday. Remember to take time for yourself before and after work. Do things that make you happy and relaxed.

If you or someone you know needs support with their anxiety, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Sources: https://www.stylist.co.uk/life/coronavirus-anxiety-return-to-work-offices-reopen-covid-secure/401175

Image Source: https://tandemhr.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/05/tandem-hr-going-back-to-work-after-covid-19-blog.jpg

Family Therapy

Family Therapy
By Kaitlyn Choi

Family therapy offers a way for patients to reconcile conflicts and ameliorate problematic relationships between family members. This kind of psychotherapy involves multiple family members for each session, confronting specific and personal issues that may be detrimental to the health of a family. Families may request therapy in times of difficulty, whether it is a major transition or period of financial, behavioral, or health crisis.

Family therapy can help treat familial issues including but not limited to:

  • Behavioral problems in children/adolescents
  • Grieving
  • Depression and anxiety
  • LGBTQ issues
  • Domestic violence
  • Infertility
  • Divorce or separation
  • Substance abuse

The general goal of family therapy is to heal any mental, emotional, or psychological problem that exerts influence on the functioning of a family. In order to do this, it is essential that therapy targets improving communication, enhancing problem solving, understanding other family members, and creating an ideal home environment.

Family therapy is an option for anyone who might be experiencing complications within their home. A family therapist helps to address such issues at the macro level rather than on the level of the individual in order to approach all the problems at hand effectively. If you or your loved ones are seeking help for the family, do not hesitate to contact a family therapist.

If you or someone you know is struggling with mental illness, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources:
http://positivepsychology.com/family-therapy/
http://mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/family-therapy/about/pac-20385237

Image Source:
http://www.schoolofskills.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/03/family-Counseling.png

Bipolar Disorder: Loving someone with bipolar disorder, the ups and downs

Bipolar Disorder: Loving someone with bipolar disorder, the ups and downs
By Zoe Alekel

Loving someone with bipolar disorder can be a challenge if you don’t have the right tools and knowledge to help both you and your loved one. The first step in loving someone with bipolar disorder would be to understand what it means to be bipolar. Although you may never know exactly how your loved one feels, it is important to understand and educate yourself about their behaviors and emotions. According to the Mayo Clinic, bipolar disorder is a mental health condition that causes extreme mood swings that include emotional highs (mania or hypomania) and lows (depression). To understand what your loved one is going through, it is key to remind yourself that your loved one can’t always control these emotional mood swings—and more importantly it is not a reflection of you or how they feel about you.

It is understandable that it can be difficult to understand these seemingly sudden and intense mood swings, and your loved one struggling with bipolar disorder may already know this and feel bad about how it affects you. Make sure you approach them with kindness, and always ask them what you can do to help them. Sometimes space and understanding that the mood swing will pass is enough support for your loved one. No matter how involved or uninvolved they want you to be with their mental health, always respect their wishes.

One thing you can do to help you cope with your loved one’s bipolar disorder is to find others that have loved ones with bipolar disorder as well. Additionally, you can reach out to a therapist to share your feelings and the struggles that you experience as someone who has a loved one diagnosed with bipolar disorder. A way you can further educate yourself on bipolar disorder is to visit the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI) website. NAMI provides credible information for those with loved ones diagnosed with bipolar disorder, and suggests you can try the following to help a family member or friend with bipolar disorder:

  • Recognizing and preventing serious mood episodes/ mood swings
  • Being able to recognize the warning signs of mania and depression
  • Making sure your loved one is taking their medication regularly and consistently (as directed)
  • Communicating and making time to talk to your loved one about their feelings when they feel ready
  • Remaining calm and rational with your loved one
  • Keeping a positive attitude and a clear mind to help your loved one the best you can
  • Reaching out for psychological support for you and your loved one

If you or someone you know is struggling with bipolar disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Sources: https://nami.org/About-Mental-Illness/Mental-Health-Conditions/Bipolar-Disorder/Support#:~:text=NAMI%20and%20NAMI%20Affiliates%20are%20there%20to%20provide,about%20bipolar%20disorder%20or%20finding%20support%20and%20resources.

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/insight-is-2020/201206/bipolar-disorder-loving-someone-who-is-manic-depressive

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/bipolar-disorder/symptoms-causes/syc-20355955#:~:text=Both%20a%20manic%20and%20a%20hypomanic%20episode%20include,sprees%2C%20taking%20sexual%20risks%20or%20making%20foolish%20investments

Image Source: https://www.bing.com/images/search?view=detailV2&ccid=Yu1OAouO&id=1B4D516A8A17EF4EE248CCCBAD2EC46DA7E6585F&thid=OIP.Yu1OAouOT_6cQM6Ql4oDYQHaLW&mediaurl=https%3a%2f%2fi.pinimg.com%2foriginals%2f13%2fbb%2f82%2f13bb82bf3d3c1b28a560d610c2d17fad.jpg&exph=1128&expw=736&q=loving+someone+with+bipolar+disorder&simid=608040637685434558&ck=DC1BFB40548A0FA375883D67352A1C1F&selectedIndex=21&FORM=IRPRST&ajaxhist=0