Workaholic = Burnout

By: Estephani Diaz

Do you find yourself always working? Are you working longer than you’re supposed to? Are you working outside of the office? Do you consistently think about work? Do you take your work everywhere you go? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, you may be a workaholic. A workaholic is defined to be a person who compulsively works hard and long hours. They are unable to detach from work to the point that they bring their work home and even on vacation. Here are seven signs indicating that you may be a workaholic:

  • Planning on how to free up more time to work
  • Spending much more time working than intended
  • Work to reduce feelings of guilt, anxiety, helplessness, and/or depression
  • Being told by others to cut down on work
  • Becoming stressed if you are prohibited from working
  • Deprioritizing hobbies, fun, exercise, leisure activities for work
  • Working so much that it has a negative influence on your health

Being a workaholic may lead to a major burnout. A burnout is a physical and/or mental collapse caused by overwork/stress. It includes insomnia, impaired concentration, loss of appetite, etc. Other symptoms consist of chronic fatigue, chest pains, migraines, anxiety, detachment from family and friends.

In order to prevent having a burnout and/or becoming a workaholic, one must create a healthy balance between work and life. Also, one must know when to stop working by developing self-awareness. Taking regular vacations, engaging with family and friends, participating in activities are just some ways to prevent a work addiction.

Workaholics anonymous and therapy can help those who have an addiction to work or are experiencing a burnout.

If you or someone you know is a workaholic or experiencing a burnout, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, please visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

 

 

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