Suicide Prevention the Right Way: Part 2

By: Sam Reiner

(cont from part 1)

That’s basically the whole article and after reading this you’re probably thinking “why would I ever show this to someone who is thinking of suicide?” Well although what he talks about may seem like the worst thing to tell people it’s in the details that makes the article really stick out. Like I said before, when Wong mentions the possibility of the afterlife he says your two options are one of the worst parts of hell or eternal nothingness. It is a scientific fact that something is always better than nothing so the downside of nothing for eternity is never explained but when he talks about Hell it is a different story. After he is done describing all the terrible things Hell has in store for the rest of eternity he brings up the fact that there are people who have it worse than you do.

Remember how I said that Wong mentions a kid with a rare skin disease. This kid’s skin is constantly drying and falling off in chunks so you would think that he might be the most likely to commit suicide because he is in constant pain. But instead, he is also over 18 years old and runs triathlons. Although it may seem random to talk about, Wong only mentions him to make a good point, if he can find a reason to live so can you. The main point of this whole section is, “if you’re figuring that, yes, you can man up and face whatever challenges the next life presents, then you might as well do that now, in this life, and skip the extra step. It’s just more efficient that way.”

Same goes for when he describes suicide methods. Like last time I don’t want to be specific on this topic but every method that he mentions is put in a way that would dissuade anyone from trying it. To me however the best part of this article is in the 3rd section, Timing. This is the section where the article really shines as it is here that Wong not only uses common sense, but statistics too when he talks about the 50% Rule. Why is the fact he uses statistics so important? It’s because that is definitive proof that you have something to look forward to and that you have a purpose. Also, when he talks about revising your suicide note, he recommends asking the suicide hotline to do it for you as they “deal with dozens of suicides every day and they know a good note when they hear one,” (very funny Wong). Honestly, I want to go into so much more detail on this article, especially the 50% Rule, but I feel as though the only way to truly see why I love this article so much is to read it. So, I’m going to put the link at the end and I really suggest you read it. I guarantee it will have you thinking differently.

http://www.cracked.com/article_15658_the-ten-minute-suicide-guide.html

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

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Generalized Anxiety Disorder

Generalized Anxiety Disorder

By: Christina Mesa

Anxiety is something that people experience in their daily lives. What characterizes Generalized Anxiety Disorder from normal anxiety is that it is chronic and the anxiety is often brought upon without a specific reason.  The worry you experience can interfere with aspects of your daily life, such as work and relationships.  Generalized Anxiety Disorder affects 6.8 million Americans and affects twice as many women as men.

Symptoms of GAD include:

  • Fatigue
  • Inability to control excessive worrying
  • Expect the worst
  • Restlessness/irritability
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Muscle tension
  • Difficulty with falling asleep, staying asleep, or unsatisfying sleep

Risk Factors include:

  • Shyness
  • Being divorced or widowed
  • Having few economic resources
  • Stressful life events in childhood and adulthood
  • Family history of anxiety disorders

If you or a loved one appears to be suffering from postpartum depression, licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/

Source: https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/generalized-anxiety-disorder

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What is it?

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Obsessive Compulsive Disorder: What is it?

By: Daniela Chica

Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD) is characterized by prolonged intervals of repetitious and undesired thoughts and compulsions. About 2.2 million Americans live with OCD and 1/3 of people who develop the disorder first experience symptoms as children. Obsessive compulsive disorder can be a lifelong condition if left untreated and it can limit people’s ability to function in everyday life. Because OCD is an anxiety disorder, deviating from usual compulsions and obsessions can cause great distress. Some common symptoms of OCD are:

  • Having repetitive thoughts or urges about a wide range of issues such as neatness, germs or violence
  • Engaging in repetitious behavior such as washing one’s hands, hoarding, or locking doors
  • Getting no satisfaction from engaging in one’s repetitious behavior, but still getting some form of relief from the anxiety caused by obsessive thoughts
  • Spending at least an hour daily on repetitious behaviors and thoughts that affect one’s normal functioning

Although there is still much to know about obsessive compulsive disorder, researchers believe that biological factors increase the risk of developing the disorder. One is also more likely to develop the disorder if a first degree relative is diagnosed with the disorder. Abuse in childhood and trauma of any sort are often linked to OCD.

If you or someone you know has obsessive compulsive disorder and needs help, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/conditions/obsessive-compulsive-disorder

Marijuana: Negative Effects in Teens

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Marijuana: Negative Effects in Teens

By: Daniela Chica

Most people fall under the misconception that marijuana use is not harmful to the body. However, current studies show that due to the increasing concentration of THC, the psychoactive chemical in marijuana, people have been experiencing withdrawal symptoms which are the possible sign of a physical dependence. Studies also show that there are increasing signs of psychological dependence in teens that use marijuana to cope with their adolescent fears and emotions. Rather than turning towards effective coping methods, they turn to the drug to give them comfort.

Marijuana also has negative effects on the heart and lungs of adolescents who use it. Although most marijuana smokers believe they’re not under the same risks as cigarette smokers, studies show that those who are regular marijuana smokers develop the same lung infections and other respiratory problems as cigarette smokers do. The hearts of regular marijuana smokers are also at risk. Studies show that smokers have a 4.8% increase in the risk of heart attack within the first hour of smoking marijuana.

If you or someone you know is experiencing problems with addiction of any sort, the psychologists and psychiatrists at Arista Counseling can help you. For more information about our center and our services please contact our Paramus, NJ office at 201-368-3700 or our Manhattan, NY office at 212-722-1920 to set up an appointment.

Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/face-it/201302/latest-news-about-teen-marijuana-use

Depression: Signs and Symptoms

Depression: Signs and Symptoms

By Daisy Lee

One of the most common mental health or mood disorders is one known as major depressive disorder, or more simply, depression. Although depression is not rare in the general population and awareness of it has been increasing, many people still struggle to spot depression. A lot of times, people can mistake depression for simply being tired or sad.

Depression can encompass many different characteristics, not all of which may manifest in a single person. For example, one person who is clinically depressed may have significant weight loss without intention while another person who is clinically depressed may have significant weight gain. The symptoms of depression are not always clear-cut. Here are a few common symptoms of depression:

  • Diminished interest or pleasure in activities
  • Significant weight loss or weight gain; increase or decrease in appetite
  • Insomnia (inability to sleep or stay asleep) or hypersomnia (sleeping too much)
  • Psychomotor agitation or retardation (slowed down movements)
  • Fatigue, lethargy, or loss of energy
  • Feelings of worthlessness or excessive/inappropriate guilt
  • Diminished ability to think or concentrate
  • Recurrent thoughts of death or suicidal ideation

As mentioned before, depression can be difficult to spot, even if you are familiar with the symptoms and what depression encompasses. If you or someone you know might be struggling with depression, speak with one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists. Contact us at our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 respectively to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source: https://psychcentral.com/disorders/depression/depression-symptoms-major-depressive-disorder/

Photo: https://themighty.com/2015/12/video-for-anyone-who-doesnt-believe-depression-is-a-medical-condition/

Serotonin Syndrome: Overview and Symptoms

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Serotonin Syndrome: Overview and Symptoms

Author: Emily Aranda

Serotonin is a neurotransmitter that effects mood, appetite, and sleep. Particularly, an imbalance of serotonin in the brain is linked to anxiety and depression. Serotonin Syndrome occurs when a person takes medication that increases his or her levels of serotonin. This can be due to increasing a single medication’s dose, adding a new drug to a daily regimen, or a combination of the two. Serotonin Syndrome can manifest itself through several different physical symptoms, though all symptoms do not need to be present in order to be diagnosed with Serotonin Syndrome.

Drugs that increase serotonin in a person’s system include the following:

  • SSRIs
  • SNRIs
  • pain medications
  • anti-migraine medications
  • MAOIs
  • anti-nausea medication
  • illegal drugs
  • lithium
  • Bupropion
  • tricyclic antidepressants
  • over the counter cough and cold medications
  • linezolid
  • ritonavir

Symptoms include:

  • agitation / restlessness
  • high blood pressure
  • rapid heart rate or irregular heart rate
  • shivering
  • headache
  • heavy sweating
  • muscle rigidity
  • loss of muscle coordination or twitching muscles
  • confusion
  • dilated pupils
  • high fever
  • seizures
  • unconsciousness

Serotonin Syndrome is an indication that a person’s medication should be adjusted properly. If you or someone you know is having issues with Serotonin Syndrome, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source:

http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/serotonin-syndrome/symptoms-causes/dxc-20305673

Suicide Prevention the Right Way

By: Sam Reiner

DISCLAIMER: The content of this blog may be seen as insensitive or may make me seem psychotic. So, before I begin I must say that I AM IN NO WAY SUPPORTING THE ACT OF SUICIDE. DO NOT KILL YOURSELF.

(never thought I’d have to say that but here we are)

Today I want to talk about suicide prevention articles and how people go about writing them. From what I have seen while searching the web, most of them are very generic and dull. They all pretty much say the same thing, “don’t kill yourself, you have so much to live for.” Don’t get me wrong, there is nothing wrong with saying that, it’s just that the reasons why someone would want to commit suicide are too complicated to be summed up so simply. So, if taking a simple approach isn’t the best choice then what should you do? Enter David Wong, the author of what I believe to be the greatest and most moving article I have ever read. He decided to write an article like no other called The Ten-Minute Suicide Guide. Now you are probably thinking how is this a suicide prevention article, and to be fair I thought the same thing. But after reading it, I have so much more appreciation for life. I’m going to briefly summarize the article and next time I will go into more detail on why this “suicide guide” works so well as a suicide prevention article.

The article starts with the story of a girl Wong knew in high school who committed suicide and what happened afterwards as a result of a botched suicide note. This is what he uses to segway into his main point of the paper, be careful in the steps you take to commit suicide. From here, Wong talks about 3 things to think about: where you will end up, how you will do it, and if it is the right time. By, “where you will end up,” Wong is talking about the afterlife and what happens to your soul. He says that there are only two real possibilities in that regard. Either the Christians were right and you’re going to hell, because under the Christian scheme suicide technically qualifies as murder, or that the atheists are right and nothing happens. He also mentions a kid who was born with a rare skin disease. More on that later.

Next, he talks about how you would actually commit suicide. Not much I really want to say about this because of obvious reasons. One thing I will mention though is that he lists the drawbacks of each method. Again, more on this later. The last thing Wong asks the reader to think about is if the timing is right. This is part is also exactly what it sounds like as it is all about picking the right time to do it and as a bonus talks about revising your suicide note and even gives you the number of a group of people that could help. That’s basically the whole article and after reading this you’re probably thinking “why would I ever show this to someone who is thinking of suicide?” Well I’m going to answer that in the next blog which should be already posted. I really did want this to be just one blog because stopping here is actually terrible but unfortunately, I have too. Next time, why is this a suicide prevention article.

If you or someone you know is thinking about suicide, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

 

Recognizing Alcohol Abuse in Teens

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Recognizing Alcohol Abuse in Teens

By Emily Aranda

Teens who experiment with alcohol put their health, safety, and reputation with the law at risk. Though many different reasons may lead to a teen abusing alcohol, these reasons all have the potential to lead to alcohol abuse by teens.

Common risk factors for teen alcohol abuse include:

  • A family history of alcohol abuse
  • A mental or behavioral health condition
  • A history of trauma
  • Low self-esteem/insecurity
  • Impulsivity
  • Peer pressure
  • A desire for social acceptance
  • Family problems
  • Close friendships with teens who drink

Teens who drink consume more than 90% of their alcohol by binge drinking. The allure of alcohol paired with its inaccessibility to those who are underage may be a reason for why, when obtained, teens tend to binge drink.

Warning Signs of underage Drinking include:

  • Change in mood, including anger/irritability
  • Academic and/or behavioral problems
  • Rebelliousness
  • Changing group of friends
  • Less interest in activities once pursued
  • Coordination problems
  • Slurred speech
  • Smelling like alcohol
  • Finding alcohol among his or her belongings

Abusing alcohol as a teen may be about more than the alcohol itself. If you or someone you know may be abusing alcohol as a teen, contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

 

Sources: https://pubs.niaaa.nih.gov/publications/UnderageDrinking/UnderageFact.htm http://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/drug-addiction/basics/definition/con-20020970

Eating Disorders: Overeating

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Eating Disorders: Overeating

By: Daniela Chica

In past decades, eating disorders have been linked to not eating or to binging and then purging, but nowadays even overeating without the purge can be seen as an eating disorder. Not just anyone who eats a whole tub of ice cream can be diagnosed with this disorder. However, someone who is experiencing a constant need to eat in order to deal with their emotions may be diagnosed with Binge Eating Disorder (BED) or Compulsive Eating Disorder (COD). For this reason, BED and COD, are both disorders that deal with and are affected by one’s emotions.

Much like in drug and alcohol addiction, people with BED and COD experience “feel good” symptoms when engaged in their overeating, symptoms that are responsible for their psychological addiction. This is one reason why it can be difficult to treat because overeating rewires the brain’s neural pathways. Another reason it can be very difficult to treat BED and COD is that identifying the emotions that trigger the overeating is not an easy task. This is because overeating occurs subconsciously or without even thinking about it. Even after identifying what the emotional problem is, it can still be difficult to set up a treatment plan because the goal is to come up with healthier ways of coping with the problem. It is much easier to turn to something accessible like food rather than dealing with the problem in a more complex way.

If you or someone you know is experiencing any type of eating disorder, please contact our psychotherapy offices in New York or New Jersey to talk to one of our licensed professional psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/.

Source:

https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/inside-out/201501/the-truth-about-overeating

Burnout vs. Depression

Burnout vs. Depression

By: Christina Mesa

Has work been making you feel exhausted lately? Have been feeling increasingly negative thoughts about work lately? Is it hard for you to concentrate at work?  If you said yes to any of these questions, you may be experiencing burnout.  Burnout is a relatively new phenomenon in which people feel exhausted and stressed because of the profession they are in.  Burnout often is especially apparent in “helping professions” such as nurses or doctors. Symptoms of burnout include exhaustion, withdrawal from work-related activities, and reduced performance at work.  Burnout and depression are often confused for each other, as the two share symptoms such as exhaustion, feeling low, and reduced performance.  Burnout is different than depression however, as people with depression not only think negative thoughts about work, but all aspects of life in general.  Symptoms of depression include low self-esteem, hopelessness, and suicidal thoughts.  People with burnout do not always have depression, although burnout may increase the risk of someone having depression.

If you or a loved one appears to be suffering from burnout or depression, licensed psychologists, psychiatrists, psychiatric nurse practitioners, and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling & Psychotherapy can assist you. Contact our Paramus, NJ or Manhattan, NY offices respectively, at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  For more information, visit http://www.counselingpsychotherapynjny.com/