Relationships: Emotional Abuse

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Relationships: Emotional Abuse

By: Catherine Ferreira

The typical image of an abusive partnership is often one of violence. It is one of bruises and broken bones; of random angry outbursts and bloodied hands. While not far from the truth, this portrayal can more often than not be greatly misleading.

There is a much deadlier, more sinister form of abuse that is not often talked about. It is not always noticeable, either. It takes the form of emotional abuse, or “any act including confinement, isolation, verbal assault, humiliation, intimidation, infantilization, or any other treatment which may diminish one’s sense of identity, dignity, and self-worth”1. Emotionally abusive relationships do not simply consist of dramatic emotional outbursts or random fits of anger. It is so deadly exactly because it is so subtle: something as simple as “You’ve been gaining a lot of weight lately” can be an act of violence because it implies your partner has a degree of control over you.

It can come out in more overt ways, too: manipulation and ultimatums; threatening to kill oneself; unfounded jealousy and a sense of entitlement; constant begging, badgering, stalking—all of these and more constitute what it means to be in an abusive relationship. Worst of all, they are symptoms of a toxic cycle that is hard to acknowledge and harder still to break.

Fortunately, however, guidance from a professional therapist can help you learn how to break out of this cycle. If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are in need of therapy or relationship counseling, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Sources

http://www.vchreact.ca/read_psychological.htm

Photo Source

http://www.nabiswa.com/

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Abuse: Emotional Manipulation (Part 1)

social-and-psychological-manipulation-bergencountyIn this mini-series of blogs, I would like to discuss the covert abuse that leaves no visible evidence except for the victim’s psychological suffering. Psychological abuse, also known as emotional abuse, is a type of abuse that can eat away at a victim’s self-esteem, autonomy, and happiness. This abuse is typically associated with power imbalance and manipulation; the abusive perpetrator is usually dominant and passive-aggressive but can seem pleasant and reasonable. This type of negative social influence has devastating effects on the victim; the goal of this abuse is to change the victim’s perspective and behavior through devious, exploitative ways in order to control the victim to get what the manipulator wants. The targeted individual rarely sees what is happening to them because manipulators conceal their true, aggressive purposes. The relationship is clearly unhealthy. This causes severe psychological damage to the victim and she becomes so dependent on the manipulator that she can no longer think for herself. Manipulators need their victims to fear them, oblige to their requests, and feel guilty if they cannot comply with those requests. Victims of psychological abuse are often codependent and abusers know how to play on their emotions and vulnerabilities. The victims can lose their sense of self, and harvest anxiety and emptiness.

There are several techniques manipulators use in order to control their victims. All of these techniques can twist a victim’s thoughts, actions and desires in order to mold her into what the manipulator wants her to be. Manipulators tend to make excuses to justify their actions, deny certain promises or agreements, play on your sympathy, use bribery to get what they want, portray fake concerns to undermine confidence, and use passive-aggressive tactics in order to express their emotions indirectly. These mental schemers also use emotional blackmail, such as guilt and fear, to cause shame and self-doubt in the victim. There are eight common warning signs to know when you are dealing with an emotionally abusive manipulator:

  1. Uses an individual’s statements against her
  2. conveniently forgets promises and agreements, and denies he ever said them
  3. uses guilt and sympathy to control the victim
  4. undermine the victim’s problems, emotions, and difficulties
  5. perform passive-aggressive actions to express anger or disappointment
  6. drain positive energy from the people around him
  7. shows little of responsibility
  8. always seem to have it worse than the victim

Emotional manipulators are controlling and this desire to control the victim is usually because manipulators are insecure themselves. Their underlying purposes in their actions are self-serving, and they have a constant need to feel more significant than the people around them. Passive, susceptible individuals are perfect to manipulate so that manipulators can obtain that feeling of power and superiority.

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and might be suffering from psychological and emotional abuse such as manipulation, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information

References:

Lancer, Darlene. “Psych Central Search.” Psych Central.com. N.p., n.d. Web. 18 June 2015.

Lenda, Paul. “8 Ways to Spot Emotional Manipulation.. and Free Ourselves From It.” The Mind Unleashed. N.p., 03 Sept. 2014. Web. 18 June 2015.

Psychotherapy: 3 Tips to Help You Calm Down Before Your Appointment

Depositphotos_25724385_originalAre you thinking of seeking psychotherapy treatment but are feeling a bit nervous? Or have you already scheduled an appointment and feel like the days counting up to it have been filled with anxious anticipation?

There are many reasons which can make you feel anxious before an appointment. Maybe you have a lot to tell your therapist but you don’t know how. Maybe you’ve been repressing your “stuff” all week and a part of you really just doesn’t want to face it in therapy. Maybe you’re afraid you’ll breakdown or embarrass yourself.

Here are some tips that may help you to stay relaxed for your appointment. Being calm can help you to make the best of the appointment and improve your healing process.

  1. Arrive early! You might feel like you have a lot of things that you want to tell your therapist but you don’t really know where to start. Your thoughts are all jumbled and messy and you’re afraid you won’t be able to put your feelings into words that your therapist will understand. Arriving early can help you to sit down and really collect your thoughts. It will allow you to organize them ahead of time and prepare the thoughts that you want to share with your therapist.
  2. Journaling. Whether you journal every day or not, it might be useful to write down your thoughts after each appointment so you can remember what your therapist told you. It would also be useful to keep a notepad or note on your phone to write down thoughts or questions that you come across throughout your week that you may want to explore with your therapist during the next session. This can also be a good way to help you organize your thoughts.
  3. Be honest. How you are feeling when you plop yourself down on the couch is not something you have to keep to yourself. Be honest with your therapist. If you have been anxious about the appointment, let him or her know. It could be important to explore together why you feel that way and maybe work on reducing your anxiety in the future. If you have been having an off day and don’t feel like talking, tell your therapist so that he or she can help you work around that. Therapy is a place to be open with your thoughts and emotions no matter what they are. Being honest can help lead to more productive therapy and help both you and your therapist understand you and your struggles better.

It’s normal to be feeling nervous before an appointment, but know that you don’t have to be. Psychotherapy is an environment in which you can heal. It can be hard, but facing your struggles and tackling them head on with a therapist has proven to be essential and very useful in the process of healing.

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are in need of therapy, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Written by Kassandra C. 
Sources:
 https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/in-therapy/201005/21-tips-clients-in-psychotherapy

Psychotherapy? Should I or Shouldn’t I?: The Effect of Stigmas on Mental Health

mentalillnessstigmaWhen you break your leg, what do you do? You go to the hospital. Similarly, when you have a mental illness, what do you do? You seek therapy. Unfortunately, this isn’t the case for many people with mental illnesses because there are stigmas associated with mental illness. Stigmas are negative and false attitudes that society holds against a group of people, which can lead to discrimination and prejudice.

Some common stigmas associated with mental illness involve:

  • People thinking mental illness isn’t a real illness
  • Mental illness isn’t common—people that have it are unique and different
  • People with mental illnesses can just “pull themselves out of it”
  • Mentally ill people are dangerous, violent, crazy, and unstable
  • Mental illness is a result of personal weakness
  • Having to see a psychotherapist means something is wrong with you or that you’re not “normal”

These, of course, are not true. Mental illness is very real and is very common. Studies show that 1 in 4 adults experience a mental illness within a given year.

As a result of these stigmas, there are harmful effects. For instance:

  • Insurance companies do not adequately cover mental illness
  • People with mental illness become reluctant to seek help
  • They may isolate themselves from family and friends due to shame and embarrassment
  • Harassment, bullying, and violence
  • Fewer job and education opportunities
  • Misrepresentation of mental illness in the media

bill-clinton-mental-illness-stigmaIf you are struggling with mental illness, know that you don’t need to fall victim to the stigmas that society upholds. They believe in stigmas because of a lack of understanding and a lack of knowledge on the topic. You don’t need to be ashamed or embarrassed. Seek psychotherapy treatment, just as you would seek medical attention if you broke your leg. In order to reduce these stigmas on mental illness, we all need to work together to educate the public about it. Share your experiences with mental illness—the more it remains hidden, the more reinforcement you give to the stigmas.

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are in need of therapy, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Written By Kassandra C.
Sources: http://www.mentalhealth.wa.gov.au/mental_illness_and_health/mh_stigma.aspx
 http://www2.nami.org/factsheets/mentalillness_factsheet.pdf

Sex Addiction: What are the Signs?

By: Michelle J. Hong

Sexual addiction is when an individual has a[ File # csp0297286, License # 1699973 ] Licensed through http://www.canstockphoto.com in accordance with the End User License Agreement (http://www.canstockphoto.com/legal.php) (c) Can Stock Photo Inc. / wackern unceasing desire to participate in sexual activities that intensifies as it progresses because the addict wants to achieve higher levels of euphoria. It is not about intimacy but about seeking pleasure or avoiding problems, so the addict usually does not try bond with his or her sexual partner.

Unfortunately, there is no one factor that can cause sexual addiction but there are possible biopsychosocial factors that can contribute to these disorders. Since sex affects the brain’s survival and reward systems, the brain sends distorted messages that sex is good to a sex addict the same way the brain tells you that food is good when we are hungry. This biological explanation can help people understand why anyone can be occupied with sexual addiction. A few psychological risk factors for this addiction include depression, anxiety, and obsessive-compulsive inclinations. Individuals with a history of addiction are more susceptible to develop sexual addiction as well. Individuals addicted to sex seem to have been sexually abused when they were young or come from broken families, and these families are more prone to substance abuse. Because of all these biopsychosocial factors, sex addicts have insecure, impulsive and compulsive personality characteristics and tend to isolate themselves from society. They have unstable relationships and have difficulty dealing with their emotions.

The DSM has yet to give definitive criteria for sexual addiction, but there are signs that people can recognize in which when to indicate whether an individual has this disorder. These signs may not be clear in the earlier stages of sexual addiction, but they will eventually become more prevalent and transparent.

Some of these signs include:

  • Compulsive masturbation or stimulation
  • Extra-marital affairs or multiple affairs in a non-married relationship
  • Multiple one night stands
  • Excessive and consistent use of pornography
  • Practicing unprotected, unsafe sex
  • Cybersex either over the phone or online
  • Prostitution or purchasing the services of a prostitute
  • Dating excessively in order to have multiple sexual partners
  • Voyeurism or watching others have sex
  • Rape, molestation, sexually harassing others

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and might be suffering from sexual addiction or sexual abuse, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information

References:
Image copyright: (c) Can Stock Photo Inc.
“Sexual Addiction – AAMFT Therapy Topic.” Sexual Addiction. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 June 2015.
“Sex Addiction.” Addictions. N.p., 23 Oct. 2012. Web. 05 June 2015.
“What Causes Sexual Addiction?” Psych Central. N.p., n.d. Web. 05 June 2015.

Anxiety and Guilt: Survivor’s Guilt (Part 4)

45e6c1edf37ff2b80fe3120ae690ec26In the last part of our series on guilt, we will explore survivor guilt—the type of guilt that arises when you are doing better than those you care about. Survivor guilt is most common in those who have survived a traumatic event when their friends or family members did not. The most common case is in the case of veterans. They may feel guilty because they lived while their fellow troops died. Similarly, a daughter who survived a car crash in which her parents died may feel this guilt. She might think, “Why did I survive and they didn’t?” “How is that fair?” “Why them? Why not me?” While this type of survivor’s guilt is common, you also don’t necessarily have to have survived something in order to experience it. You might just be doing better than someone else at something—maybe you’re living in a million dollar house while a close friend’s on the brink of homelessness due to financial struggles.

rsz_img1_802Whatever the case may be, someone struggling with survivor’s guilt tends to think that they did something wrong by surviving the traumatic event or for doing better than someone else. Sometimes it may arise as a symptom of post-traumatic stress disorder, which is a mental condition that can arise from experiencing trauma. Survivor’s guilt may come with an influx of emotions such as joy, relief, grief, sadness and gratitude. You may feel happy and relieved for surviving but sad and burdened because others did not. It is also common to feel like you’ve been given a second chance and you, therefore, respond by taking a huge burden upon yourself to live life to its fullest. While it is good to have this heightened sense of purpose, these emotions and self-imposed burdens can get very overwhelming.

In order to overcome survivor’s guilt, it is important to realize that there are people out there that genuinely care for you and love you. What happened isn’t your fault and you didn’t do anything wrong by surviving. While it’s so heartbreaking to deal with a loss, remember that whoever you lost would probably feel happiest if you used the experience to build a better you. Make them proud, but don’t overload yourself with expectations. While nothing you do can bring them back, use this new, broader vision of life to your advantage and to others’ advantage. Make them proud, but more importantly, make yourself proud!

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are having trouble dealing with guilt, PTSD, self-criticizing thoughts, or self-esteem issues, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment. Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Written by Kassandra C.
 Sources: Krauss, Susan W. (2012, Aug. 11). The Definitive Guide to Guilt: The five types of guilt and how you can cope with each. Retrieved from
 https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fulfillment-any-age/201208/the-definitive-guide-guilt

Anorexia Nervosa is a Fatally Serious Illness

anorexia-nervosa-bergen-county

Anorexia nervosa is a restricting type of eating disorder that involves an unhealthy, severe reduction of food intake due to body dissatisfaction and extreme concern about weight. Individuals with anorexia nervosa see themselves as overweight even though they are dangerously thin. Women are more likely than men to develop an eating disorder and approximately 0.5 to 3.7 percent of women specifically suffer from anorexia nervosa in their lifetime.  It is the most common cause of death among young women. The mortality rate for anorexia is 0.56 percent per year, which is about 12 times higher than all other causes of death among females ages 15-24 in the general population. The course and outcome of this eating disorder vary across individuals; some individuals can fully recover after a single episode but some experience a continuing deterioration from this illness over years. Individuals with anorexia repeatedly check their body weight, avoid eating food or eat food in tiny quantities, and engage in various techniques to control their weight, such as intense exercise or abuse of laxatives. Adolescent girls with anorexia experience amenorrhea, which is an absence or delayed menstruation.

Common symptoms of anorexia include:

  • Resistance to maintaining body weight at or above a minimally normal weight for age and height
  • Intense fear of gaining weight, even though underweight
  • Disturbance in the way in which one’s body weight or shape is experienced
  • Denial of the seriousness of the current low body weight
  • Infrequent or absent menstrual periods
  • Picking out a few foods or carefully portioning food
  • Constant, ceaseless weight checking and obsession

Since many individuals with anorexia tend to conceal their unusual eating habits and wear baggy clothes to hide weight loss, this illness can advance to life-threatening stages before it is noticed by families, friends, and romantic partners. Fortunately, eating disorders can be treated and individuals can become healthy again. Anorexia nervosa treatment is a specific program that involves three main steps:

  1. Restoring weight lost to severe dieting and purging
  2. Treating distorted body image, low self-esteem and interpersonal conflicts
  3. Achieving long-term remission and rehabilitation

An early diagnosis of anorexia nervosa can increase a successful outcome of treatment and medication should be considered after a healthy weight gain has been reached. Certain SSRIs (serotonin reuptake inhibitors) have been helpful for weight maintaining and resolving mood and anxiety symptoms for this disease. Once individuals with anorexia have gained weight and malnutrition has been restored, psychotherapy can help them overcome deeply-rooted self-esteem issues and body image distortions.

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and might be suffering from eating disorders such as anorexia nervosa, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information

Anxiety and Guilt: Feeling Guilty for Saying No (Part 3)

guilt-bergen-county-njMost of us have probably had friends, families, or acquaintances ask us for help that we didn’t always want to give. Maybe you have a friend that always misses class because he oversleeps and he asks you for your notes every single time. Or perhaps your friend is going through a breakup and she’s messaging you 24/7 about it. You were fine with it at first, but now it’s getting a little overwhelming. Maybe that friend isn’t just going through a breakup and is dealing with something more serious—maybe she is depressed or someone close to her is very ill.

No matter what the situation may be, there are going to be times when we feel obligated to help someone. The closer this person is to us, the more obligated we feel to help them. But sometimes there may come a point where you continuously helping them will no longer do any good. In the case of the oversleeping classmate, if you keep giving him notes, he will never go to class and learn how to pass a class on his own. If you are your friend’s 24/7 boyfriend replacement, then you are encouraging her behavior and not actually helping her to get her mind off it. If your friend is depressed, there also comes a point where your advice can no longer help—the best solution would be to see a psychotherapist.

The question is: when you reach the point where you can’t help anymore, how do you go about saying no without feeling guilty? First, try to understand why you feel guilty about saying no. Is it because you want to help but you just don’t have the time to do it? Is it because you’re afraid the person will think you don’t care about him/her? If you understand why you have a hard time saying no, then it will help you be more rational and help you better explain to the person why you need to say no. Understanding your own feelings and thought processes can facilitate and encourage a healthier conversation when the time comes.

Second, recognize that you can’t do everything and that you can’t please everybody. There’s a difference between being a good friend and being an easy target. A more colloquial term for this might be a “pushover.” Of course it’s good to help a person as best as you can, but you have to use your own rational judgment. You can’t expect yourself to do everything for everyone—it’s just not possible and it’s not fair to you either. If helping is becoming a burden and you know it’s no longer doing any good, then it’s okay to say no. Explain to the person why and offer them alternatives. In the case of someone who is struggling with an illness, you can do your part by suggesting or helping them to contact a professional who is actually qualified and able to help. For your friend that keeps asking for your notes, perhaps offer instead to call him before each class to make sure he’s awake. There are alternatives, and you never need to carry a burden that you can’t handle.

Lastly, put yourself at ease by thinking about all the times you have actually said “yes” instead of the times you are saying “no.” You have probably helped them a whole lot already, so just know that you’ve done your best and done your part.

If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are having trouble dealing with guilt, self-criticizing thoughts, or self-esteem issues, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Written by Kassandra C.
 Sources: Krauss, Susan W. (2012, Aug. 11). The Definitive Guide to Guilt: The five types of guilt and how you can cope with each. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fulfillment-any-age/201208/the-definitive-guide-guilt

Anxiety and Guilt: Guilt That’s in Your Head (Part 2)

In the last entry on guilt, we talked about the type of guilt that arises when you do something wrong. This time, we will look at the guilt that comes just from the things that you think, which can also cause anxiety. You didn’t actually commit any action. Instead, perhaps you think you did something wrong, or just secretly want to do something that seems wrong.

An example of a type of unwanted thought that could cause guilt may be feeling attraction towards someone you wouldn’t normally feel attracted to or aren’t “supposed to” feel attracted to—for example, someone of the same sex or your best friend’s partner. Other intrusive thoughts that trigger guilt could be dirty or violent thoughts about someone you know—again, someone that you shouldn’t have these thoughts about because they seem “messed up,” appalling, or simply just wrong. You feel guilty because these thoughts are labeled as forbidden, and you know you shouldn’t be thinking them, but you just can’t help it. Perhaps you wished for something bad to happen to someone, and it actually did happen. You may also feel guilty because not only did you have those thoughts to begin with, but it also seems as if they actually came true because you had wished it.

If you are experiencing guilt just from the thoughts in your head, you’ll find that it is quite common for people to deal with them by “putting them away.” We often just shift our attention away from the thought.” We might also deal with them by denying that we even had such thoughts. We think to ourselves, “No, you weren’t thinking that. That didn’t happen. I was just being silly.” Repressing these thoughts and denying them are not long-term, effective ways to deal with these thoughts and the guilt that accompanies them. Even though they may seem inappropriate or forbidden, it is important to recognize that sometimes we cannot always control what we think.

Rather than trying to repress or deny unwanted and intrusive thoughts, a better approach would be to learn to accept them. Just as we mentioned in our previous entry on guilt, acceptance is the first step on the way to getting rid of these guilty feelings. Although these thoughts may be disturbing to you and you don’t want to think them, recognize that it is okay and that it is normal. What is important is that you do not act on the thoughts, but simply make a conscious effort to reduce them. If guilty feelings are arising from something you think you did, first check to make sure you’re not wrongly accusing yourself. It’s also common for people to blame themselves for more than they should.

Remember that you don’t need to struggle alone. If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are having trouble dealing with guilt, self-criticizing thoughts, or self-esteem issues, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

Written by Kassandra C.
 Sources: Krauss, Susan W. (2012, Aug. 11). The Definitive Guide to Guilt: The five types of guilt and how you can cope with each. Retrieved from https://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/fulfillment-any-age/201208/the-definitive-guide-guilt

OCD: Obsessive Compulsive Disorder – What It’s Like to Live with a Neat Freak

obsessive-compulsive-disorder-neat-freakWe’re all aware of those three little letters that when put together can cause serious problems: OCD. Things that people do in their everyday life, like wash their hands and clean their rooms become harrowing tasks due to their intrusive thoughts and repetitive behaviors. OCD, or Obsessive Compulsive Disorder, is an anxiety disorder that traps people in obsessive thoughts and ritualistic behaviors that can be completely disabling. This, however, is very different from a neat freak.

Usually, neat freaks’ overbearing concern about order could be a “shadow syndrome” of OCD, a mild, indistinct expression of OCD. “Neat Freaks” often have certain areas in particular where they’ve set extremely high standards for neatness, and while they could be really aggravating to live with, their neatness does not impair or incapacitate them as it would someone suffering from OCD. For example, they could care less about the mess in the living room, but if one book is out of place in their office, it’s surely a sign of apocalypse and their impending doom.

Any sign of disarray in the areas that neat freaks hold dear troubles them because it signifies for the person a lack of control. Neat freaks are often synonymous with control freaks, and while their actions can be far less debilitating than those with OCD, it may be causing that person stress and anxiety. If you or a loved one live in Manhattan or Bergen County New Jersey and are suffering from unwanted stress or anxiety due to trying to maintain order and cleanliness, the psychiatrists, psychologists, psychiatric nurse practitioners or psychotherapists at Arista Counseling can assist you. Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.