Anorexia Nervosa: How New Health Trends Can Make Eating Disorders Thrive

 

anorexia nervosa blog photo With all of the new trends regarding fitness, clean and organic eating, and juicing, it’s hard not to get caught up in society’s idea of what it means to be fit or skinny. For women, it’s always been about being thin and young looking, while men struggle to gain muscle and have six pack abs. While there is nothing wrong with wanting to exercise and eat healthier, there are still those who expect immediate results and, when they don’t get them, turn to extreme methods. So it’s no wonder that we also see an increase in eating disorders every time a new health craze hits.

There are several different varieties of eating disorders, but this blog will be primarily discussing Anorexia Nervosa and its effects on the youth of today. Anorexia Nervosa is an eating disorder characterized by refusal to eat and, according to the National Institute of Mental Health, it has the highest fatality rate of any psychiatric disorder and frequently coexists with other mental disorders such as anxiety, depression, and substance abuse. Here are some symptoms to be on the lookout for in case you or a loved one may be suffering from Anorexia:

  • Extremely low body weight
  • Severe food restrictions
  • Relentless pursuit of thinness and unwillingness to maintain a normal/ healthy body weight
  • Intense fear of gaining weight
  • Distorted body image and self-esteem that is influenced by perceptions of body weight or shape
  • Amenorrhea, or the absence of at least 3 menstrual cycles

Anorexia is a serious disease and could lead to other medical complications such as osteoporosis, low blood pressure, brittle hair and nails, mild anemia, and multi-organ failure, just to name a few. If you are concerned that you or a loved one may be suffering from Anorexia, the licensed counselors and psychotherapists at Arista Counseling and Psychotherapy can assist you.  Contact our Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan offices of psychologists, psychiatrists, and psychotherapists at (201) 368-3700 or (212) 722-1920 to set up an appointment.  Visit http://www.acenterfortherapy.com for more information.

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