Anxiety: Separation Anxiety Disorder When Your Kid is going off to College

By: Alison Schwartz

At this time of the year, in the end of August, many parents experience anxiety and depression because they feel they are losing their child. This feeling among parents is quite normal, but may be misunderstood.  Envy is another common emotion parents may experience, as they feel their life is ending, while their child’s life is just beginning. They often wish they were at that point again in their lives. The main struggle for parents is finding a comfortable balance between letting go and holding on just enough.

Arguing and fighting are common occurrences between parents and adolescent children before they head off to college.  Children may pick fights about banal matters such as what they are bringing to their dorm rooms. These arguments may serve to mask the pain when children and their parents separate.  The child is trying to become independent, a normal part of development at this point in his or her life, which the parent often perceives as rejection. Therefore, one of the ways to cope with separation anxiety is to remember that these arguments stem from the child’s way of dealing with leaving the comfort of home and simultaneously feeling excited about college.

To better cope with this phase in life, realize that separation anxiety is a normal process that parents face.  Listening and compromising may help with the painful and confusing emotions of both parents and children. On a hopeful note, the arguing and pulling away reduces as children grow and develop during college.  To learn about children’s separation anxiety as they leave for college, see Anxiety: Separation Anxiety Disorder When Going off to College.

If you are seeking for Separation Anxiety, contact Arista Counseling and Psychological Services at (201) 368-3700 to set up an appointment with our mental help professionals in Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan, NY.

Separation Anxiety Disorder When Your Kid is going off to College

Anxiety: Separation Anxiety Disorder When Your Kid is going off to College

Sources:

http://www.goodtherapy.org/blog/off-to-college-parental-separation-anxiety-0612136

http://www.psychologytoday.com/blog/the-couch/201008/leaving-college-why-families-argue-more-right-the-separation

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Anxiety: Separation Anxiety Disorder When Going off to College

By: Alison Schwartz

As the school year begins, students starting their freshman year of college may experience separation anxiety. Young adults often feel conflicting emotions of anticipation and fear of embarking on this new phase in life. They are leaving the familiarity and security of home, and are faced with a new found independence which requires making choices every day, such as what food to eat and which classes to take.  Incoming freshman feel overwhelmed; fortunately there are ways to help manage this anxiety.

Merely acknowledging that a transition phase will occur may help when starting life at college. This phase is often short, especially when that time is filled with meeting new people and joining clubs. Also, realizing that the majority of new freshman feel the same way and feeling nervous is normal, may ease the separation anxiety.  Thinking of “what if?” scenarios may fuel anxiety and nervousness; not letting these anticipations get out of control can help reduce anxiety.

The relationship with parents may change and develop as well.  Separation anxiety exists on both sides, and may manifest itself in increased bickering. Communicating with parents and recognizing that they may experience the same feelings will mature the relationship, which may help with transitioning to a more independent lifestyle. For further information on separation anxiety in parents, see Anxiety: Separation Anxiety Disorder When Your Kid is going off to College.

Separation Anxiety Disorder When Going off to College

Anxiety: Separation Anxiety Disorder When Going off to College

If you are seeking help for Separation Anxiety, contact Arista Counseling and Psychological Services at (201) 368-3700 to set up an appointment with our mental help professionals in Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan, NY.

Source:

http://www.foxnews.com/health/2011/08/16/separation-anxiety-leaving-for-college/

Anxiety & Stress: The Effect on College Students

By: Amy Griffith

     There is no denying that college students are under extreme amounts of stress. Earlier this year, 19-year-old Madison Holleran, a freshman at the University of Pennsylvania, jumped from a parking garage to her death due to stress. She gave no outwards signs of being suicidal, making plans to meet friends for dinner and posting an Instagram picture of Rittenhouse Square an hour before her death. This is a clear indication that regardless of how successful one is, stress and anxiety can affect anyone.

     According to the survey, “The American Freshman: National Norms Fall 2010,” which involved more than 200,000 incoming full-time students at four-year colleges, the percentage of students rating themselves as “below average” in emotional health rose. Meanwhile, the percentage of students who said their emotional health was above average fell to 52 percent. It was 64 percent in 1985 (NY Times). The second leading cause of death among college students is suicide, which counts for approximately 1,100 deaths on campuses per year. The first leading cause of death is accidents (drinking and driving and overdoses), which could potentially be linked to depression and anxiety as well (Business Week).

     Some of the outward signs of stress are: feeling continuously anxious and nervous, gastrointestinal issues, aches and pains, sleep issues, frequent illness, high blood pressure, feelings of withdrawal from friends and family, and frequent headaches. If you or someone you know is experiencing these symptoms, feel free to contact Arista Counseling and Psychological Services at (201) 368-3700 to set up an appointment with a mental health professional in Bergen County, NJ or Manhattan, NY.

Sources:

University of Pennsylvania track star jumped to death over grade

Record Level of Stress Found in College Freshmen

Stress Takes Its Toll on College Students